Database Trial – BBC Monitoring

bbcWe’ve gone global with this month’s trial resource, which is likely to prove of great interest to anyone with an interest in current affairs.

BBC Monitoring is a division of the BBC World Service Group that provides Open Source information services for governments, NGOs, analysts, academics, multinationals and international organisations. Many of BBCM’s staff have strong academic backgrounds and its operations are based on round-the-clock monitoring of TV, radio, press, internet, news agency and social media sources.

BBCM analysts are located in the UK and worldwide and its main focus areas are geopolitics, terrorism and security-related issues, and the media & sociological impact of major world and regional events. BBCM has particular expertise in the Russian sphere, the Middle East, Iran, Central Asia and Africa, as well as opening a new office in Miami to increase the quality and quantity of coverage for Latin America. The BBC Monitoring portal contains c.4 million stories and 5,000 reports, an archive back to 1996, as well as up-to-date government lists and reference material.

To begin searching go to https://monitoring.bbc.co.uk/#/login

Click on the Login box

Click on ‘Login via Academic Institution’

Click on ‘Loughborough’

Login with your Loughborough University username and password (not Athens)

The trial will run until January 31st 2017 – please note that not all content is accessible to trial users.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, please contact Steve Corn ( s.c.corn@lboro.ac.uk )with your comments.

Never Let Go of the Book Club!

51NcMaqTCsL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_The Student Book Club meets up for the last time this term (and 2016) next Monday 5th December when the novel up for discussion will be Patrick Ness’s award winning science fiction thriller The Knife of Never Letting Go.

A coming of age story with a spine-chilling twist, the novel picked up the 2008 Guardian Award and is the first part of a trilogy entitled Chaos Walking.

All of our copies have been borrowed ahead of the next meeting, but you can still find it in all good book shops. The Club will be meeting at the usual time, 7pm, in the Library Staff Room.

For more information about the Club, please contact Sharon Reid at the Library: S.D.Reid@lboro.ac.uk, ext. 222403, or why not join the discussion on our Facebook page?

Kindred Spirits at the Loughborough Town Hall

sock-gallery-sml-LOGO PING colourThere’s an exotic family theme to the latest art exhibition at Loughborough Town Hall’s Sock Gallery this winter.

Rita Sadler and Ingrid Kleins-Daniels are cousins whose mothers settled in Leicestershire from Latvia after the Second World War.  Continuing the family tradition of creativity, both are experienced art tutors who are developing their own artistic pathways through a similar love of colour, texture and experimentation with different materials.

Rita and Ingrid share an interpretative style of work that expresses both the spirit felt in the landscape as well as in dance. Rita uses her local landscape and the area around Garendon Park, Loughborough as a source of inspiration, whereas Ingrid’s focus is through the dynamics of the human form in movement and dance.

Kindred Spirits runs from 24th November to 2nd January. The Sock Gallery is free to enter and is open Monday – Saturday from 9am – 5.00pm and when the venue is open for shows.

Weekend of Weird at the Martin Hall

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LU Arts is remaining in the Halloween spirit this November with a weekend long exploration of everything Weird, hosted in the Martin Hall Theatre on Saturday 26th & Sunday 27th November.

A Weekend of Weird brings together writers, performers, filmmakers, artists, publishers, academics, enthusiasts and celebrants to ask: what is the Weird? Where did it come from? Where is it going?

The Weird is an emerging field that encompasses literature, film, music, art and performance. Its world is subtly strange, uncanny, irrational, inexplicable, questioning our everyday environments and perceptions and implying that our world is far more bizarre and disturbing than we would like to believe.

The weekend will comprise panel discussions, live performances, film screenings and a specialist book fair. It is organised by Radar in collaboration with Nick Freeman and Dan Watt from Loughborough University’s School of the Arts, English and Drama.

A Weekend of Weird centres around a series of main panel discussions with contributions from John Hirschhorn-Smith, Andrew Michael Hurley, Timothy Jarvis, James Machin and Mark Valentine. These sessions will be interspersed with live performances and a series of specially curated film programmes.

For this programme Radar has commissioned new works by Joey Holder, Ben Judd, Tai Shani and artist collective Reactor. There will also be screenings of work by Sidsel Christensen and Pauline Curnier Jardin.

Full programme information can be found on the LU Arts website here:

http://www.arts.lboro.ac.uk/radar/events/event/a_weekend_of_weird

International Day at the Students’ Union

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On Wednesday 16th November the Students’ Union are hosting their highly popular annual International Day. Students from all around the globe studying at Loughborough will represent their countries by sharing their culture and lifestyle by giving out food, samples of drinks, activities, performances and much more.

Make sure you don’t miss out this amazing opportunity to get the feel of more than 40 different nations and cultures on the day, which kicks off at 11am and finishes at 3pm. Entry is free.

For more information, go to www.lsu.co.uk/internationalday/. If you have any questions or would like to know more then please do not hesitate to contact internationalday@lsu.co.uk.

Man Booker Prize 2016 – It’s a Sellout!

Winner-announcement-graphicCongratulations to novelist Paul Beatty, who became the first American writer in 48 years of competition to win the prestigious Man Booker Prize for his novel The Sellout.

The Sellout has been described as a topical satire on race relations in contemporary America as seen through the eyes of an African-American man living in a run-down fictional American town in the process of being torn apart by increasingly rising racial tensions.

Paul Beatty is the first American author to win the £50,000 prize after US authors became eligible in 2014. The 2016 shortlist included two British, two US, one Canadian and one British-Canadian writer.

We will shortly be adding The Sellout to our stock, but in the mean time you can find and read previous Man Booker Prize winning and nominated novels upstairs among our Leisure Reading collection on Level 4.

Database Trial – Illustrated London News Historical Archive

ilnWe’re offering another venerable newspaper archive in electronic format this month, in the shape of the Illustrated London News Archive 1842-2003.

On Saturday 14th May 1842, a publishing revolution occurred. The world’s first pictorial weekly newspaper was born: The Illustrated London News. Its founder, Herbert Ingram, was an entrepreneurial newsagent, who noticed that newspapers sold more copies when they carried pictures. The inaugural issue covered a fire in Hamburg, Queen Victoria’s fancy dress ball, the war in Afghanistan and the latest fashions in Paris. The ILN commissioned a galaxy of great artists and draughtsmen to cover wars, royal events, scientific invention, and exploration. In 1855 it launched the world’s first colour supplement. Over the years the publication played host to distinguished contributors and continued to push the boundaries of journalism throughout its history.

To access the archive go to: http://infotrac.galegroup.com/default/loughuni?db=ILN – for off-campus access you will need your Athens username and password.

The trial will run until November 18th 2016.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, please contact Steve Corn – s.c.corn@lboro.ac.uk – with your comments.

Database Trial – Telegraph Historical Archive

telegraphThis month we’re trialling the electronic archive of one of the UK’s most popular broadsheet newspapers, the Daily Telegraph.

Launched in 1855, The Telegraph was the first 1d morning paper (The Times was 7d). By 1876, The Telegraph was the largest-selling newspaper in the world, with a circulation of 300,000. The newspaper was directed at a wealthy, educated readership and is commonly associated with traditional Toryism, despite its more ‘liberal’ beginnings. However, this shifted in the late 1870s, when the newspaper began to support British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli over the Eastern Question.

Under the editorship of poet and Orientalist Edwin Arnold from 1873 to 1899, the newspaper published widely on foreign affairs and foreign cultures. This led to The Telegraph’s coverage of Henry Morton Stanley’s expedition to Africa in search of David Livingstone, which it co-sponsored with the New York Herald in 1874. Its dedication to foreign news coverage was evidenced by its employment of several renowned special correspondents over the years; Winston Churchill, who reported from India in 1897, Rudyard Kipling, who braved the trenches of the First World War, and Clare Hollingworth, who, as the first female war correspondent, relayed the start of the Second World War from Poland.

The Telegraph Historical Archive 1855-2000 has over 1 million pages of content and includes the Sunday edition from its inception in 1961.

To access the archive go to http://infotrac.galegroup.com/default/loughuni?db=TGRH – for off-campus access you will need your Athens username and password.

The trial will run until November 18th 2016.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, please contact Steve Corn – s.c.corn@lboro.ac.uk – with your comments.

National Poetry Day

Poetry-Day-logoToday is National Poetry Day, a nationwide celebration of poetry for everyone, everywhere, which falls every year on the first Thursday of October. Since it was first launched in 1994, the day has been marked by a nationwide celebration of all things poetic.

From 1999 onwards, National Poetry Day has been loosely “themed” – the theme is not prescriptive but it serves to kick start inspiration. This year’s theme is ‘Messages’, with the aim of encouraging people to literally “say it with a poem”!

Thanks to our own English & Drama School, we’ve built up quite an extensive range of poetry, ancient and modern, ranging from the Greek epic poetry of Homer to Shakespeare’s Sonnets, to the 19th century classics of Coleridge and William Wordsworth, to the contemporary poetry of Philip Larkin and Andrew Motion. Not forgetting our comprehensive range of literature databases available on Library Catalogue Plus, most notably Literature Online (LION), from which you can glean everything you ever wanted to know about your favourite poem or poem. Why not have a browse?

Explore Ancient Greece With the British Library

blHave you ever wondered what books looked like in antiquity? Perhaps you have pondered why some manuscripts are written on paper and some on parchment? Did you know that the ancient Greeks thought up machines and robots powered by steam? These issues and more are taken up on a new web resource launched by the British Library today dedicated to the study of Greek written heritage, Greek Manuscripts.

Intended to complement and promote the hundreds of Greek manuscripts digitised by the British Library in recent years, the website contains articles on a wide variety of subjects relating to Greek papyri and manuscripts, written by experts from the UK, continental Europe, and North America. Additionally, several videos provide short visual introductions to key topics. Collection items discussed in the articles are given separate item pages, with links to the online catalogue entry and full digital coverage on Digitised Manuscripts.

For more information, visit the British Library site here:

http://blogs.bl.uk/digitisedmanuscripts/2016/09/the-british-librarys-greek-manuscripts-project.html