Online Daily Newspaper Access

While our daily newspaper deliveries have been temporarily suspended, what better time to remind people that you can still catch up with the latest news via Nexis UK.

The Nexis UK database provides a wide range of UK, European and U.S. newspapers online, on the day of publication. You can find all of the UK national papers as well as a wide range of regional titles.

Nexis UK can be found via the Library Catalogue, you just need your Athens username and password.

http://www.lexisnexis.com/uk/nexis/auth/athensredirection.do

Congratulations to Kazuo Ishiguro

Congratulations to British author Kazuo Ishiguro, who was today announced as the winner of the 2017 Nobel Prize for Literature.

Best known for the 1989 Booker Prize winning novel The Remains of the Day, Kazuo Ishiguro was born in Japan in 1954 but emigrated with his family to England in 1960. His first novel, A Pale View of Hills (1982) actually started life as his masters thesis! He has published 8 novels in total so far, and two – Remains of the Day (1993) and Never Let Me Go (2010) – have been successfully adapted for cinema.

The Library holds copies of several of his novels among our literature section on Level 2, along with a broad spectrum of representative and critical works of the greatest authors of all time.

I, Daniel Blake: Film Screening and Discussion

The Edward Herbert Building is hosting a free screening of the film, I, Daniel Blake, followed by a discussion led by CPWS researchers, next Wednesday (3rd May) at 6pm.

I, Daniel Blake is an important and powerful film about the nature of work and life on benefits in contemporary Britain. Directed by Ken Loach and starring Dave Johns as the title character, it won the prestigious Palme d’Or at the 2016 Cannes Festival.

The event is organised and sponsored by the Centre for Professional Work and Society (CPWS), in the School of Business and Economics at Loughborough University.

The screening is free, but booking is necessary. To attend, visit the link below:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/i-daniel-blake-film-screening-and-discussion-tickets-32913947503

Woman(kind)ness, Strength and Resilience: A Celebration of Women Worldwide

Next Monday sees the start of a week-long series of events on campus as part of the International Women’s Day initiative, raising awareness for women’s roles in different sociocultural environments, highlighting gender inequalities, and proposing creative ways towards gender equity and equality.

In collaboration with Charnwood Arts, Living Without Abuse-Loughborough, and Human Rights and Equalities Charnwood, the week includes photo and art exhibitions, crafts, theatre performances, and science-based public talks aiming to celebrate women worldwide, beginning on Monday 6th March.

Full details of the programme of events can be found via the link below:

https://www.internationalwomensday.com/Activity/7669/Woman-kind-ness-Strength-and-Resilience-A-celebration-of-women-worldwide-2017

On the Radar – Syncopolitics

Join Dr Fred Dalmasso of the School of Arts, English & Drama next week for a lively discussion on the notion of ‘syncopolitics’

Dr Dalmasso has coined the term syncopolitics in response to Catherine Clément’s seminal book, Syncope – the Philosophy of Rapture, where she stresses that “syncope is spectacle, it shows off, exposes itself, smashes, breaks, interrupts the daily course of other people’s lives, people at whom the raptus is aimed.” Dr Dalmasso will look in particular at how the image of syncope and the syncope of the image might radically displace or dissolve the self and thus offer strategies of resistance against norms through renouncement or disappearance; a recess of the image that he considers as a sine qua non condition for thinking politics as what can only happen within a horlieu (an out-place or non-place) of representation: a syncopolitics that resonates with what Badiou calls inexist[a]nce.

The discussion will be taking place in the Radar ArtSpace in the Edward Barnsley Building on Wednesday 15th February between 2-3pm. Entrance is free but booking is required – please email aed.research@lboro.ac.uk if you would like to attend.

Database Trial – BBC Monitoring

bbcWe’ve gone global with this month’s trial resource, which is likely to prove of great interest to anyone with an interest in current affairs.

BBC Monitoring is a division of the BBC World Service Group that provides Open Source information services for governments, NGOs, analysts, academics, multinationals and international organisations. Many of BBCM’s staff have strong academic backgrounds and its operations are based on round-the-clock monitoring of TV, radio, press, internet, news agency and social media sources.

BBCM analysts are located in the UK and worldwide and its main focus areas are geopolitics, terrorism and security-related issues, and the media & sociological impact of major world and regional events. BBCM has particular expertise in the Russian sphere, the Middle East, Iran, Central Asia and Africa, as well as opening a new office in Miami to increase the quality and quantity of coverage for Latin America. The BBC Monitoring portal contains c.4 million stories and 5,000 reports, an archive back to 1996, as well as up-to-date government lists and reference material.

To begin searching go to https://monitoring.bbc.co.uk/#/login

Click on the Login box

Click on ‘Login via Academic Institution’

Click on ‘Loughborough’

Login with your Loughborough University username and password (not Athens)

The trial will run until January 31st 2017 – please note that not all content is accessible to trial users.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, please contact Steve Corn ( s.c.corn@lboro.ac.uk )with your comments.

Man Booker Prize 2016 – It’s a Sellout!

Winner-announcement-graphicCongratulations to novelist Paul Beatty, who became the first American writer in 48 years of competition to win the prestigious Man Booker Prize for his novel The Sellout.

The Sellout has been described as a topical satire on race relations in contemporary America as seen through the eyes of an African-American man living in a run-down fictional American town in the process of being torn apart by increasingly rising racial tensions.

Paul Beatty is the first American author to win the £50,000 prize after US authors became eligible in 2014. The 2016 shortlist included two British, two US, one Canadian and one British-Canadian writer.

We will shortly be adding The Sellout to our stock, but in the mean time you can find and read previous Man Booker Prize winning and nominated novels upstairs among our Leisure Reading collection on Level 4.

National Poetry Day

Poetry-Day-logoToday is National Poetry Day, a nationwide celebration of poetry for everyone, everywhere, which falls every year on the first Thursday of October. Since it was first launched in 1994, the day has been marked by a nationwide celebration of all things poetic.

From 1999 onwards, National Poetry Day has been loosely “themed” – the theme is not prescriptive but it serves to kick start inspiration. This year’s theme is ‘Messages’, with the aim of encouraging people to literally “say it with a poem”!

Thanks to our own English & Drama School, we’ve built up quite an extensive range of poetry, ancient and modern, ranging from the Greek epic poetry of Homer to Shakespeare’s Sonnets, to the 19th century classics of Coleridge and William Wordsworth, to the contemporary poetry of Philip Larkin and Andrew Motion. Not forgetting our comprehensive range of literature databases available on Library Catalogue Plus, most notably Literature Online (LION), from which you can glean everything you ever wanted to know about your favourite poem or poem. Why not have a browse?

1966 and All That!

England-1966-fifa-world-cup-logo_SEINNI_MYNDINThis weekend marks the 50th anniversary of the England football team’s World Cup final victory over West Germany at Wembley stadium on 30th July 1966.

A hard-fought contest over 90 minutes saw the match go into extra time with the score poised at 2-2, but two further goals by Geoff Hurst – making him the first and so far only player to score a hat-trick in a World Cup final – won the match for England 4-2. Not without some controversy – debate still rages over whether or not England’s third goal was actually legitimate, as certain camera angles appeared to show that the ball had not crossed the line.

England’s fortunes in subsequent finals have been mixed; a semi-final appearance at Italy 1990 under Bobby Robson has been their best achievement since 1966. Indeed, controversy seems to have followed England’s World Cup performances – on and off the field! Alf Ramsey’s ill-advised substitution of the talismanic Bobby Charlton during the quarter final against West Germany in 1970 has long since been deemed responsible not only for losing England the match 3-2 in extra time (after England led 2-1 with 8 minutes to go), but also subsequently – in a dour reflection of the black mood of the country – for then Prime Minister Harold Wilson’s surprise defeat in the 1970 General Election which took place four days after the match!

England fans would also choose to forget Diego Maradona’s infamous ‘Hand of God’ goal in the 2-1 quarter final defeat to Argentina at Mexico 1986, while German fans may claim a degree of cosmic football karma during their second round 4-1 knock-out of England at South Africa 2010, when Frank Lampard’s would-have-been equalising goal for 2-2 was disallowed despite having crossed the goal line – a reverse echo of Hurst’s goal in 1966, perhaps!

We hold a large stock of books about football and football coaching among our sports section on Level 2, and if you care to revisit England’s World Cup adventures as reported by the press of the time, why not take a trawl through our online newspaper archives?

Earth Day 2016

earth day 2016As today is International Earth Day, what better time to remind you of the University’s very own Sustainability project and website.

The University is committed to acting in a socially responsible way that maximises its positive impact and minimises its negative impact on society and the communities in which it is based. This is reflected in the University’s strategy Building Excellence which states that “we will embed sustainability and social responsibility into all of our processes, operations and developments” and also “will work closely with local partners to enhance the social, cultural and economic wellbeing of the communities and regions in which we reside”.

Why not visit the Sustainability website to find out more?

Earth Day has been celebrated globally since 1970, with the aim of inspiring and motivating people to action over environmental issues. Every year the campaign tackles a new theme, and this year the theme is Trees For the Earth, a plan to plant 7.8 Billion trees by Earth Day 2020 – one tree for every person on the planet!

To find out more about the campaign – and how to participate – visit the Earth Day website below:

http://www.earthday.org/