Changes to RefME

We have recently been informed that the company producing the referencing software tool, RefME has been taken over and that from 28th February 2017, RefME accounts will be transferred to their own citation product Cite This For Me. For some time Library staff have recommended RefME as a referencing software tool for undergraduate students.  Following this news, Library staff have assessed Cite This For Me and unfortunately, many of the freely available features of RefME will become paid for features in Cite This For Me. More details about the transition from RefME to Cite This For Me are available via this link:

https://refme.zendesk.com/hc/en-gb/articles/115000823509

The loss of functionality in the free version of Cite This For Me is clearly very disappointing for RefME users and since Cite This For Me only offers individual subscriptions, the Library will not be able to offer support for the new product. We are currently assessing other freely available referencing software products but until we have identified something suitable we would recommend Mendeley as alternative tool as it offers a sophisticated array of functions. More information about Mendeley is available on our referencing software Learn module below:

http://learn.lboro.ac.uk/enrol/index.php?id=3539

Database Trial – Bloomsbury Fashion Central

Those interested in fashion and fashion design are very likely to find our latest database trial of enormous interest. The Bloomsbury Fashion Central is the new site for fashion educators, students, and professionals.

The site comprises of textbook site open to all and three subscription products as follows:

  • Fairchild Books: Over 130 Fairchild Books textbooks with student/instructor resources.
  • Berg Fashion Library: Scholarly articles, eBooks and 13,000 images on world dress and fashion.
  • Fairchild Books Library: All Bloomsbury Fashion Central textbooks and student/instructor resources, available on subscription.
  • Fashion Photography Archive: 750,000 images, supported by hundreds of articles, designer biographies, audio and video.

To begin searching go to https://www.bloomsburyfashioncentral.com/  access is via IP address and the trial runs to 27th March 2017.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, please contact Steve Corn –   s.c.corn@lboro.ac.uk – with your comments.

January 24-7 Opening

Our January 24-7 Opening period begins when we open for the start of term on Monday 9th January at 8.30am and will run until 2am on Thursday 2nd February. As is customary, we’d like to issue a few gentle reminders about 24-7 etiquette…

Firstly, please respect your fellow users by considering what behaviour is (and isn’t!) appropriate in the Library by studying our guide to Library facilities on our homepage.

Space is ALWAYS at a premium during exam time, and sadly there are always a few who feel the need to take up more space than they actually need – even when they’re not actually in the building! So please, be kind and considerate and don’t leave your stuff lying about when you’re not there, as you’re depriving other people of a much-needed place to study. We WILL be removing any items left unattended for 30 minutes to free up space (assuming someone else doesn’t help themselves to your stuff first!).

Also please remember to keep your ID card with you at all timeseven when you go for a break. Any attempt to enter the Library without your card will count as one of your three strikes. Quite apart from the fact that you need it to gain entry to the Library, it is a University regulation that you keep your ID card with you at all times while on campus – if you lose it, you must report it and buy a replacement. And don’t lend your card to your friends – that’s against regulations too, and if we catch you, we will report you.

Levels 1,2 and 4 are intended to be areas for quiet study – please remember to keep the noise levels down to an absolute minimum on these floors, or you will be asked (nicely, by us, probably not so nicely by your fellow revisers!) to desist. If you want to chat – or have a snack – Level 3 is the designated social area.

Our designated Silent Study Area is on Level 4. When we say SILENT, we do mean SILENT! If you cannot abide by this, you will be asked to leave the area if you persist in causing disruption to your fellow users. We genuinely don’t like telling people off as much as they don’t like being told off, but for the sake of those genuinely wishing to study, we cannot tolerate bad behaviour or disrespect towards other users and staff. We appreciate that at times like this the stress levels rise, but though there are plenty of places on campus to let off steam the Library is NOT one of them! This applies just as much to use, or indeed misuse, of social media – think before you post anything, however witty you may think it is!

Our bookable study rooms, carrels and pods are pretty busy even off-peak, but during exam periods they’re especially popular. Please remember that you have to book them first before you can use one – don’t just turn up and sit down assuming the space is available, because it probably isn’t! And if you do book a space, please remember to actually come and use it. We give people 15 minutes to claim their reservation, otherwise we will allow someone else to use it – it’s simply not fair on other students to leave rooms unclaimed & unused. We try to monitor room bookings daily and update availability via our dedicated Twitter feed – it might be worth keeping an eye on it if you need to book a room at any point.

Please use the bins and recycling containers to keep the Library clean and tidy. Please remove all rubbish from your desk when you go – leave it as you would expect to find it!

If you’re a smoker, please remember that you cannot smoke directly outside the Library entrance – you must use the smoking shelter in the Library car park opposite. Some of you are probably getting as tired of being told this as we are of telling you, but get used to being nagged (or worse) if you continue to ignore this rule – it is a University regulation, and subject to the same disciplinary procedure if you break it.

Although the Library is open 24-7, the Library Enquiry Desks are only staffed between 8.30am – 10pm. During the evening, the Library is supervised by security staff. If you need printer credit, remember that you can buy it online. Please remember, though, if you experience any problems at all regarding any of the Library facilities, just ask any member of staff, or contact us through our Ask a Librarian email service or our Twitter and Facebook feeds – we’re here to help you as best we can.

Best of luck!

Busy End of Term! Alternative Study Spaces Available

lev2

The New Year Exam period seems to have come early, if the occupancy levels in the Library have been anything to go by over the last couple of weeks! We’ve been exceptionally busy for the time of year with most of our study areas full to over-flowing at times, and our Group Study Rooms booked two-three days in advance.

If you can’t find a suitable space in the Library, don’t fret – there are plenty of other places you can go on campus to study, including tailor-made Learning Zones at the James France and Brockington Buildings, not forgetting the PC and printing facilities in the Haslegrave Building.

Full details of all the alternative study spaces can be found via the link below:

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/services/corporate/learning/learning/

Database Trial – BBC Monitoring

bbcWe’ve gone global with this month’s trial resource, which is likely to prove of great interest to anyone with an interest in current affairs.

BBC Monitoring is a division of the BBC World Service Group that provides Open Source information services for governments, NGOs, analysts, academics, multinationals and international organisations. Many of BBCM’s staff have strong academic backgrounds and its operations are based on round-the-clock monitoring of TV, radio, press, internet, news agency and social media sources.

BBCM analysts are located in the UK and worldwide and its main focus areas are geopolitics, terrorism and security-related issues, and the media & sociological impact of major world and regional events. BBCM has particular expertise in the Russian sphere, the Middle East, Iran, Central Asia and Africa, as well as opening a new office in Miami to increase the quality and quantity of coverage for Latin America. The BBC Monitoring portal contains c.4 million stories and 5,000 reports, an archive back to 1996, as well as up-to-date government lists and reference material.

To begin searching go to https://monitoring.bbc.co.uk/#/login

Click on the Login box

Click on ‘Login via Academic Institution’

Click on ‘Loughborough’

Login with your Loughborough University username and password (not Athens)

The trial will run until January 31st 2017 – please note that not all content is accessible to trial users.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, please contact Steve Corn ( s.c.corn@lboro.ac.uk )with your comments.

ProQuest Ebook Central Upgrade

proquest blueProQuest have just completed the migration of their Ebook Library (EBL) resource onto a completely new platform, and have renamed and rebranded the service as ProQuest Ebook Central.

Several changes have been made to the database, with some new functions added, including the ability to be able to download and save a full chapter of an ebook and keep a copy of it – useful if you only require a particular chapter of a book.

Further details of the upgrade can be found via the ProQuest website:

http://www.proquest.com/customer-care/product-upgrades/

New Resource – The Business & Management Collection

bmcThe Library now has full subscription access to The Business Management Collection, a collection over 950 specially recorded, animated lectures and case studies by more than 850 contributing editors and speakers from commerce, industry, the professions and academia.

New talks are issued every month. Lectures and case studies, or extracts from them, are easy to integrate and embed in courses to enrich the teaching and learning experience. They are all compatible with Moodle and particularly appropriate for distance and blended learning courses and flipped classroom education.

The collection is divided into six broad subject areas – Finance, Accounting & Economics; Global Business Management; Management Leadership & Organizations; Marketing & Sales; Strategy and Technology & Operations. Lecturers and presenters are leading academic experts and practitioners from commerce and industry.

Content is presented in four different formats (click on the hyperlink to view example):

  • Traditional format lectures with high quality graphics. The entire lecture as well as extracts can be embedded in course notes and online learning systems.
  • Case Study Interviews. They are designed to explore how different participants in commerce and industry, from start-up entrepreneurs to large corporation executives, confront the challenges they encounter. Additionally, all videos are accompanied by suggested topics for discussion and individual and group projects.
  • Extended form case studies. These accounts of real world experience describing what was done, how, when and with what consequences have proved especially useful in preparing students for in-class discussions.
  • Bite-size case studies. These short descriptions of real world commercial activities come with suggested topics for consideration and discussion. Subscribers have found that they stimulate thinking and assist is developing the ability of students to question, analyse and appraise. They are often set as pre-classroom preparation and in-class discussion

The collection offers institution-wide access enabling all faculty, students, Executive Education, alumni and distance/online programs unlimited and unrestricted access to the entire collection. You will automatically be authenticated on campus; for off-campus access, you may be required to enter the following details:

Username: Lboro  Password: Member.

Your Education Week 28th November – 2nd December

Learning style_landscape screen

This week the Student Union is running its Your Education Week initiative across campus. Teams of programme presidents and representatives will be out and about across campus helping students find out how to improve their learning style and get more out of their studies.

The Library will be supporting the initiative by hosting a stall in the foyer on Tuesday 29th November between 12pm-4pm, but you can also find a wealth of information about how to improve your studying and academic practice via our online help resources. Two in particular are especially useful – we have our own Study Tips module on Learn at http://learn.lboro.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=11494 , and also the Learning Support web pages which you can find at  http://www.lboro.ac.uk/services/library/students/learningsupport/

EBook Library (EBL) Technical Issues

proquestWe are sorry to report that we appear to have lost access to ebooks that are usually available through Proquest’s Ebook Library (EBL) platform. The problem is not limited to Loughborough University, as it seems that all institutions that use OpenAthens for authentication are also experiencing problems. The issue has been reported to Proquest and we hope that they will resolve the issue ASAP.

We apologise for any inconvenience.

Database Trial – Publishers Weekly Digital Archive

BG19511020_1_1-200wWe’re running a trial of another venerable and long-running popular publication now in digital format, Publishers Weekly, the American Book Trade Journal.

Continuously published since 1872, Publishers Weekly has consistently been the authoritative voice for US publishing industry news and book reviews, with ongoing coverage of the British book trade. The complete archive includes up to 400,000 book reviews, 5,000 author profiles/interviews, and bestseller lists from 1895 forward.

This primary source archive contains every page of Publishers Weekly published over its first 141 years, all in its original context, in full color, and fully searchable to support lines of inquiry into print media and digital culture, American studies, popular culture, history of the book, literature, history, humanities, and their many sub-disciplines. This collection contains 1,889 issues comprising 135,165 pages.

To access the archive go to: http://pubweekly.napubcoonline.com. Access is direct from on-campus.

The trial will run until December 7th 2016.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, please contact Steve Corn ( s.c.corn@lboro.ac.uk ) with your comments.