Murder, She Read… Student Book Club Launch Night

murder she readIf you fancy reading and chatting about great novels from lots of different genres, enjoying home-baked refreshments and taking part in other social activities, why not come along to the official crime-themed launch of the Loughborough University Student Book Club at 7pm on Tuesday October 20th in the Village Bar?

  • Scampi and chips for £2.95!
  • Guest speaker: John Martin – author and authority on crime writing
  • Pick up a brand new copy of Now You See Me by Sharon Bolton, the first great novel we’ll be discussing
  • Exciting prize draw!
  • Display of crime novels

For catering purposes, please register your interest in attending with Sharon at the Library:

Comments from previous members:
“Thanks so much for doing this club by the way, it’s been great!”
“It is fun and the sessions…are a good chance to meet new people”
“I’ll be coming to the meeting … I can’t wait to talk about the book”

International Student Book Club

照片 2Do you like reading stories and meeting people from other cultures? Would you like to develop your skills in spoken English? If so, this club is for you! You will discover the pleasure of reading short books by well-known authors and share your ideas in a friendly, relaxed environment. The club is free to join and you will be provided with all the books we discuss on a first-come first-served basis.

If you would like to know more, please email Sara Bosley at or just come to our first meeting in Seminar Room One in the Library at 5pm on 6th October. You can also join us on Facebook.

All students are welcome to the general Loughborough University Student Book Club where you can discuss longer novels. For more information, please contact Sharon Reid at the Library: ext. 222403, or why not join the Club’s Facebook page?

Whowonit? Happy 125th Birthday Agatha Christie

secret pilgrimSeptember 15th marks the 125th birthday of the celebrated mystery writer Agatha Christie, and to mark the occasion the author’s estate ran an online poll to determine which of her novels is the most popular.

Perhaps surprisingly, the winner is not one of the stories featuring either of her most famous characters, Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple, but the 1939 thriller And Then There Were None, which received 21% of the final vote ahead of Murder on the Orient Express and The Murder of Roger Ackroyd.

And Then There Were None is perhaps the archetypal whodunit, in which ten strangers are stranded on a lonely island and then murdered one by one. The book has sold over 100 million copies worldwide and has been filmed several times.

Although we don’t currently hold many copies of her novels in our stock, we do have a growing range of mysteries and thrillers in our Leisure Reading collection upstairs on Level 4, written by contemporary mystery novelists who undoubtedly cut their literary teeth on Agatha’s work!

The Body in the Library cover image by the Secret Pilgrim, reproduced under CC License from Flickr.

Animal Tales at the British Library

blFrom Aesop’s Fables to Ted Hughes’s Crow, the stories we tell about animals are often stories about us. A new exhibition, Animal Tales, begins at the British Library today which goes on the trail of animals on the page, asking why they have come to play such an important role in literature for adults and children alike.

From the earliest marks made by humans in caves to the modern-day internet full of cute cats, animals have been enduring media stars. Symbols of the sacred or the profane, the domesticated or the ferocious, animals have always fed our imagination helping us to make sense of the world and ourselves. Inspiring writers, poets, scientists and artists through the ages, a library can become the largest zoo in the world when you begin to track down the creatures lurking among the pages on the shelves.

Animal Tales explores what wild – and tamed – creatures say about us when they take on literary or artistic form and displays richly illustrated editions of traditional tales, from Anansi to Little Red Riding Hood. And be closer to nature with a soundscape based on the Library’s collection of sound recordings, with illustrations and poems by Mark Doty and Darren Waterston.

The exhibition is free to attend, and runs until 1st November. Further details can be found on the British Library site here.

Roald Dahl – Top of the Form!

6142946853_49c55033ed_mRoald Dahl’s Charlie & the Chocolate Factory has been voted top of a list of books teachers consider that all children should read before they leave primary school in a new poll conducted by the Times Educational Supplement and the National Association of Teaching English.

500 teachers compiled a list of what they considered to be the best children’s stories, resulting in the following top ten:

  1. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
  2. Goodnight Mister Tom by Michelle Magorian
  3. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
  4. Matilda by Roald Dahl
  5. The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson
  6. The Chronicles of Narnia by C S Lewis
  7. The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
  8. We’re Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen
  9. Dogger by Shirley Hughes
  10. Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak

Those nostalgic to reclaim a little of their lost youth may be delighted to hear that we have copies of all but one of those stories among our stock – sadly, The Gruffalo was just a bit too big and rowdy to keep on our shelves!

Roald Dahl portrait by Sally, reproduced under CC License from Flickr.

E.L. Doctorow 1931-2015

15213777537_345c43d100_zThe award-winning American historical novelist E.L. Doctorow has died, aged 84.

Born in 1931, Edgar Lawrence Doctorow began his literary career as a script-reader for Columbia Pictures, and his first novel, Welcome to Hard Times, published in 1960, was inspired by the many western stories he had to read in this time.

He gained widespread critical acclaim for his fourth novel Ragtime, which won him the first of three US National Book Critics Circle Awards in 1975. Billy Bathgate (1989) and The March (2005) also received the award. In total Doctorow wrote ten novels, four of which were filmed. Ragtime was also successfully adapted as a stage musical in 1998.

We have copies of several of Doctorow’s novels in our literature section on Level 2, including Ragtime, of which we also hold a copy of the 1981 Oscar-nominated cinema adaption among our DVD collection in the High Demand section.

You can also find out a lot more about his life and works by visiting Literature Online, our popular English & American literature database which covers over 300,000 works of poetry, prose and drama from the 8th to the 21st century.

E.L. Doctorow at the PEN American Centre Literary Awards 2014, courtesy of Beowulf Sheehan, reproduced under CC License from Flickr.

Find Elizabeth With the Student Book Club


Why not take the edge off your exam preparations by joining in with the next meeting the Student Book Club on Monday 18th May, when the novel up for discussion is Emma Healey’s award-winning thriller Elizabeth is Missing. 

We’ll be meeting in the Library Staffroom as usual at 7pm – just ask at the Customer Services Desk for directions. All copies of the book have now been borrowed for the meeting, but you can still buy it for your Kindle or from local booksellers

For more information about the Club, please contact Sharon Reid at the Library:, ext. 222403, or why not join the discussion on our Facebook page?


Loughborough Literary Salon

Literary%20Salon_INLINEThe University will be hosting its annual Literary Salon next Tuesday, on the theme of ‘The Return of Books and Paper’, which explores the shift from paper to digital based reading and the effect this has had on how people value the book.

Offering an evening of conversation and lively debate, the Literary Salon provides the opportunity for participants to speak to leaders within the field and look at the work being showcased. Aimed at writers, authors, publishers, creative industry professionals, University staff, students and members of the public, the idea is to network, share and learn in an informal atmosphere.

The evening will feature talks delivered by experts from the School of Arts, English and Drama, alongside industry specialists and writers. Confirmed guest speakers include:

  • Wim Van Mierlo: Works in Publishing at Loughborough University
  • Anne-Marie Beller: Author and Lecturer of English at Loughborough University
  • Matthew James Kay: Contemporary freelance artist with a focus on mixed media creations
  • Sarah Kelly: Poet, paper artist and poet in residence for the academic year
  • Karen Jinks: Freelance artist who uses her own illustrations to cover handmade notebooks

It will take place in the Martin Hall Theatre next Tuesday, 12th May, and starts at 7pm. The event is free to students, staff and alumni, and £5 to members of the public. Booking is required regardless, and do that, visit this link:

On the Radar… DIY & Anarchist Publishing

1363LU Arts Radar, supported by the LU Communication, Culture and Citizenship Research Challenge, are presenting a thought-provoking discussion about the world of underground publishing next Wednesday (6th May).

The discussion is headlined by Richard Cubesville, a journalist, and is the force behind One Way Ticket to Cubesville zine, a vehemently DIY slice of anarcho-absurdism in existence since 1987, and Stevphen Shukaitis, an academic at the University of Essex and is the coordinator of the Minor Compositions publishing project, which bills itself as a series of interventions and provocations drawing from autonomous politics, avant-garde aesthetics, and the revolutions of everyday life.

Both these presenters are actively engaged in forms of publishing that differ markedly from the industry norm – but they differ from one another too.  This presentation and discussion of their approaches will illuminate the political significance of alternative publishing, against the backdrop of a rapidly changing publishing world.

There will also be a mini-exhibit of zines before and after the session.  The event is free and open to all, and starts at 5pm in the LU Arts Project Space in the Edward Barnsley Building.

Help Us Celebrate World Book Night on Thursday


If you’re in the Library this Thursday lunchtime, why not stop by our stand in the Library foyer and help us celebrate World Book Night by grabbing yourself a FREE book and a delicious piece of home-made cake.

We’ll be giving away copies of three novels (you can find out which on the day) along with a selection of cakes and snacks. In previous years (including last year, pictured above) the books and cakes have disappeared in super quick-time, so it really is a case of first come, first served – pop along early to avoid missing out on a treat.

World Book Night is an annual celebration of reading and books that takes place on 23rd April (we delayed our celebration for a week until you were all back from your Easter holidays!). It sees passionate volunteers give out hundreds of thousands of books in their communities to share their love of reading with people who don’t read regularly or own books. World Book Night is run by The Reading Agency, a national charity that inspires people to become confident and enthusiastic readers to help give them an equal chance in life.