Never Let Go of the Book Club!

51NcMaqTCsL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_The Student Book Club meets up for the last time this term (and 2016) next Monday 5th December when the novel up for discussion will be Patrick Ness’s award winning science fiction thriller The Knife of Never Letting Go.

A coming of age story with a spine-chilling twist, the novel picked up the 2008 Guardian Award and is the first part of a trilogy entitled Chaos Walking.

All of our copies have been borrowed ahead of the next meeting, but you can still find it in all good book shops. The Club will be meeting at the usual time, 7pm, in the Library Staff Room.

For more information about the Club, please contact Sharon Reid at the Library: S.D.Reid@lboro.ac.uk, ext. 222403, or why not join the discussion on our Facebook page?

Weekend of Weird at the Martin Hall

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LU Arts is remaining in the Halloween spirit this November with a weekend long exploration of everything Weird, hosted in the Martin Hall Theatre on Saturday 26th & Sunday 27th November.

A Weekend of Weird brings together writers, performers, filmmakers, artists, publishers, academics, enthusiasts and celebrants to ask: what is the Weird? Where did it come from? Where is it going?

The Weird is an emerging field that encompasses literature, film, music, art and performance. Its world is subtly strange, uncanny, irrational, inexplicable, questioning our everyday environments and perceptions and implying that our world is far more bizarre and disturbing than we would like to believe.

The weekend will comprise panel discussions, live performances, film screenings and a specialist book fair. It is organised by Radar in collaboration with Nick Freeman and Dan Watt from Loughborough University’s School of the Arts, English and Drama.

A Weekend of Weird centres around a series of main panel discussions with contributions from John Hirschhorn-Smith, Andrew Michael Hurley, Timothy Jarvis, James Machin and Mark Valentine. These sessions will be interspersed with live performances and a series of specially curated film programmes.

For this programme Radar has commissioned new works by Joey Holder, Ben Judd, Tai Shani and artist collective Reactor. There will also be screenings of work by Sidsel Christensen and Pauline Curnier Jardin.

Full programme information can be found on the LU Arts website here:

http://www.arts.lboro.ac.uk/radar/events/event/a_weekend_of_weird

Database Trial – Publishers Weekly Digital Archive

BG19511020_1_1-200wWe’re running a trial of another venerable and long-running popular publication now in digital format, Publishers Weekly, the American Book Trade Journal.

Continuously published since 1872, Publishers Weekly has consistently been the authoritative voice for US publishing industry news and book reviews, with ongoing coverage of the British book trade. The complete archive includes up to 400,000 book reviews, 5,000 author profiles/interviews, and bestseller lists from 1895 forward.

This primary source archive contains every page of Publishers Weekly published over its first 141 years, all in its original context, in full color, and fully searchable to support lines of inquiry into print media and digital culture, American studies, popular culture, history of the book, literature, history, humanities, and their many sub-disciplines. This collection contains 1,889 issues comprising 135,165 pages.

To access the archive go to: http://pubweekly.napubcoonline.com. Access is direct from on-campus.

The trial will run until December 7th 2016.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, please contact Steve Corn ( s.c.corn@lboro.ac.uk ) with your comments.

Man Booker Prize 2016 – It’s a Sellout!

Winner-announcement-graphicCongratulations to novelist Paul Beatty, who became the first American writer in 48 years of competition to win the prestigious Man Booker Prize for his novel The Sellout.

The Sellout has been described as a topical satire on race relations in contemporary America as seen through the eyes of an African-American man living in a run-down fictional American town in the process of being torn apart by increasingly rising racial tensions.

Paul Beatty is the first American author to win the £50,000 prize after US authors became eligible in 2014. The 2016 shortlist included two British, two US, one Canadian and one British-Canadian writer.

We will shortly be adding The Sellout to our stock, but in the mean time you can find and read previous Man Booker Prize winning and nominated novels upstairs among our Leisure Reading collection on Level 4.

National Poetry Day

Poetry-Day-logoToday is National Poetry Day, a nationwide celebration of poetry for everyone, everywhere, which falls every year on the first Thursday of October. Since it was first launched in 1994, the day has been marked by a nationwide celebration of all things poetic.

From 1999 onwards, National Poetry Day has been loosely “themed” – the theme is not prescriptive but it serves to kick start inspiration. This year’s theme is ‘Messages’, with the aim of encouraging people to literally “say it with a poem”!

Thanks to our own English & Drama School, we’ve built up quite an extensive range of poetry, ancient and modern, ranging from the Greek epic poetry of Homer to Shakespeare’s Sonnets, to the 19th century classics of Coleridge and William Wordsworth, to the contemporary poetry of Philip Larkin and Andrew Motion. Not forgetting our comprehensive range of literature databases available on Library Catalogue Plus, most notably Literature Online (LION), from which you can glean everything you ever wanted to know about your favourite poem or poem. Why not have a browse?

Explore Ancient Greece With the British Library

blHave you ever wondered what books looked like in antiquity? Perhaps you have pondered why some manuscripts are written on paper and some on parchment? Did you know that the ancient Greeks thought up machines and robots powered by steam? These issues and more are taken up on a new web resource launched by the British Library today dedicated to the study of Greek written heritage, Greek Manuscripts.

Intended to complement and promote the hundreds of Greek manuscripts digitised by the British Library in recent years, the website contains articles on a wide variety of subjects relating to Greek papyri and manuscripts, written by experts from the UK, continental Europe, and North America. Additionally, several videos provide short visual introductions to key topics. Collection items discussed in the articles are given separate item pages, with links to the online catalogue entry and full digital coverage on Digitised Manuscripts.

For more information, visit the British Library site here:

http://blogs.bl.uk/digitisedmanuscripts/2016/09/the-british-librarys-greek-manuscripts-project.html

Database Trial – The Poetry Review

poetry reviewIf you’re interested in poetry either for academic purposes or reading for pleasure, you may wish to take advantage of the latest electronic resource we’re trialling.

Since it was founded in 1912, The Poetry Review has been home to the world’s best writing – by both internationally renowned and emerging poets, newcomers and Nobel Prize winners.

To view the journal go to: www.exacteditions.com/iplogin/thepoetryreview – access is via IP address and the trial runs to 14th August 2016.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, please contact Steve Corn with your comments.

Fruit Routes Renga

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Fruit Routes,  the University’s artist-led project designed to bring people together on Campus around themes of food, foraging and the natural world, are delighted to be hosting their first Renga on the campus on Friday 10th June.

Renga is a 1000 year old Japanese form of collaborative non-narrative poetry made up of a series of short linked verses. The process of writing a renga is a shared creative experience open to all. The renga welcomes absolute beginners (age 8 +) as well as experienced writers.

Renga is a frame that binds people, landscape and seasons. It is led by a master poet, who holds the map, and a host poet.   Joining the Fruit Routes renga will be local artist, cultural forager and poet Little Onion (Paul Conneally) and Kerry Featherstone (Lecturer in Creative Writing, Loughborough University).

Over the four hours of the event participants will experience the rhythm of writing, reading, listening, the silence and sound that is renga – and tea!.

The event is free to attend but registration is necessary. To do that, and for more information about the event and the Fruit Routes initiative, visit this link:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/fruit-routes-renga-tickets-25313928642?aff=eac2

Database Trial: Eighteenth Century Drama

d218d8635edd40fbb240ce7560974acfThis month we’re trialling an Adam Matthew resource that should be of much interest to English & Drama students or anybody interested in the history of British theatre.

Eighteenth Century Drama features the John Larpent Collection from the Huntington Library – a unique archive of almost every play submitted for licence between 1737 and 1824, as well as hundreds of documents that provide social context for the plays. Explore the Larpent plays, papers of prominent theatrical figures of the period, including correspondence, financial documents, and portraits. Cross-reference this with essential searchable databases created from information in The London Stage 1729-1800 and A Biographical Dictionary of Actors, Actresses, Musicians, Dancers, Managers Other Stage Personnel in London, 1660-1800.

To begin searching please go to: www.eighteenthcenturydrama.amdigital.co.uk – access is via IP address and the trial runs to 17th June 2016.

NB: Please note that PDF download options are not available during trials.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, please contact Steve Corn.

Don’t Be Reluctant – Join Our Club!

51j4tBJNp-L._SX323_BO1,204,203,200_The Student Book Club meets for the last time this academic year when we will be discussing Mohsin Hamid’s highly acclaimed The Reluctant Fundamentalist.

Published in 2007 and set against the background of the aftermath of the September 11 Attacks, the novel tells the story of a seemingly chance meeting between two strangers in a busy Lahore street – yet neither man is quite what they seem.

Adapted for the silver screen in 2012, the book was short-listed for the 2007 Booker Prize, and named by the Guardian newspaper as one of the books of the decade.

The Book Club will be meeting up to discuss the book in the Library Staff Room on Monday 16th May at 7pm. Copies of the book are still available to borrow ahead of the meeting – just ask for a copy at the Level 3 Enquiry Desk.

For more information about the Club, please contact Sharon Reid at the Library: S.D.Reid@lboro.ac.uk, ext. 222403, or why not join the discussion on our Facebook page?