Explore Ancient Greece With the British Library

blHave you ever wondered what books looked like in antiquity? Perhaps you have pondered why some manuscripts are written on paper and some on parchment? Did you know that the ancient Greeks thought up machines and robots powered by steam? These issues and more are taken up on a new web resource launched by the British Library today dedicated to the study of Greek written heritage, Greek Manuscripts.

Intended to complement and promote the hundreds of Greek manuscripts digitised by the British Library in recent years, the website contains articles on a wide variety of subjects relating to Greek papyri and manuscripts, written by experts from the UK, continental Europe, and North America. Additionally, several videos provide short visual introductions to key topics. Collection items discussed in the articles are given separate item pages, with links to the online catalogue entry and full digital coverage on Digitised Manuscripts.

For more information, visit the British Library site here:

http://blogs.bl.uk/digitisedmanuscripts/2016/09/the-british-librarys-greek-manuscripts-project.html

Database Trial – The Poetry Review

poetry reviewIf you’re interested in poetry either for academic purposes or reading for pleasure, you may wish to take advantage of the latest electronic resource we’re trialling.

Since it was founded in 1912, The Poetry Review has been home to the world’s best writing – by both internationally renowned and emerging poets, newcomers and Nobel Prize winners.

To view the journal go to: www.exacteditions.com/iplogin/thepoetryreview – access is via IP address and the trial runs to 14th August 2016.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, please contact Steve Corn with your comments.

Fruit Routes Renga

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Fruit Routes,  the University’s artist-led project designed to bring people together on Campus around themes of food, foraging and the natural world, are delighted to be hosting their first Renga on the campus on Friday 10th June.

Renga is a 1000 year old Japanese form of collaborative non-narrative poetry made up of a series of short linked verses. The process of writing a renga is a shared creative experience open to all. The renga welcomes absolute beginners (age 8 +) as well as experienced writers.

Renga is a frame that binds people, landscape and seasons. It is led by a master poet, who holds the map, and a host poet.   Joining the Fruit Routes renga will be local artist, cultural forager and poet Little Onion (Paul Conneally) and Kerry Featherstone (Lecturer in Creative Writing, Loughborough University).

Over the four hours of the event participants will experience the rhythm of writing, reading, listening, the silence and sound that is renga – and tea!.

The event is free to attend but registration is necessary. To do that, and for more information about the event and the Fruit Routes initiative, visit this link:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/fruit-routes-renga-tickets-25313928642?aff=eac2

Database Trial: Eighteenth Century Drama

d218d8635edd40fbb240ce7560974acfThis month we’re trialling an Adam Matthew resource that should be of much interest to English & Drama students or anybody interested in the history of British theatre.

Eighteenth Century Drama features the John Larpent Collection from the Huntington Library – a unique archive of almost every play submitted for licence between 1737 and 1824, as well as hundreds of documents that provide social context for the plays. Explore the Larpent plays, papers of prominent theatrical figures of the period, including correspondence, financial documents, and portraits. Cross-reference this with essential searchable databases created from information in The London Stage 1729-1800 and A Biographical Dictionary of Actors, Actresses, Musicians, Dancers, Managers Other Stage Personnel in London, 1660-1800.

To begin searching please go to: www.eighteenthcenturydrama.amdigital.co.uk – access is via IP address and the trial runs to 17th June 2016.

NB: Please note that PDF download options are not available during trials.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, please contact Steve Corn.

Don’t Be Reluctant – Join Our Club!

51j4tBJNp-L._SX323_BO1,204,203,200_The Student Book Club meets for the last time this academic year when we will be discussing Mohsin Hamid’s highly acclaimed The Reluctant Fundamentalist.

Published in 2007 and set against the background of the aftermath of the September 11 Attacks, the novel tells the story of a seemingly chance meeting between two strangers in a busy Lahore street – yet neither man is quite what they seem.

Adapted for the silver screen in 2012, the book was short-listed for the 2007 Booker Prize, and named by the Guardian newspaper as one of the books of the decade.

The Book Club will be meeting up to discuss the book in the Library Staff Room on Monday 16th May at 7pm. Copies of the book are still available to borrow ahead of the meeting – just ask for a copy at the Level 3 Enquiry Desk.

For more information about the Club, please contact Sharon Reid at the Library: S.D.Reid@lboro.ac.uk, ext. 222403, or why not join the discussion on our Facebook page?

Where There’s A Will, There’s A Website!

shakespeare by books18To mark the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare two brand new electronic resources have been launched by the BBC and Oxford University Press.

The BBC Shakespeare Archive Resource contains a wealth of Shakespeare material, including all of his plays, poems and sonnets, documentaries, interviews and over a thousand stills of classic Shakespeare productions, as well as entertainment programmes referencing Shakespeare.

Oxford University Press’s Illuminating Shakespeare provides access to Shakespeare resources from the wealth of material published by OUP and explores a new theme every month with specially commissioned videos, articles, and interactive content.

Don’t forget as well that the British Library last week launched their own anniversary exhibition, Shakespeare in Ten Acts.

William Shakespeare portrait copyright Books18, reproduced under CC License from Flickr.

Shakespeare in Ten Acts at the British Library

blThis week the British Library is inviting people to join them on a journey through 400 years of history – from the first productions of Hamlet and The Tempest – to understand how Shakespeare’s plays have been transformed for new generations of theatre-goers.

Shakespeare in Ten Acts showcases over 200 unique and rare items such as the only surviving play-script in Shakespeare’s hand, an authentic Shakespeare signature, the earliest printed edition of Hamlet from 1603 and Shakespeare’s First Folio.

Complementing the exhibition is a new online learning resource, Discovering Literature: Shakespeare. Whether you’re a student, teacher, researcher, or simply a lover of literature, Discovering Literature: Shakespeare will encourage critical thinking and independent learning to enrich your understanding of all-things Shakespeare.

The exhibition runs until September 6th. For more details, visit the link below:

http://www.bl.uk/events/shakespeare-in-ten-acts

Calling All Poets! Overton Poetry Prize 2016

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In memory of Professor Bill Overton (1946-2012), the School of the Arts, English and Drama offers this prize for a sequence of poems on any subject, up to 300 lines, which will be judged by the University’s own poet in residence, Helen Calcutt.

Much of Professor Overton’s teaching and writing was on poetry, and the proceeds from this competition will fund an early-career poet in residence for Loughborough University. It is hoped that this poetry prize, set up in Professor Overton’s memory, will  contribute to the creative life of the School, and the experience of its students.

Entries and payment of fee (£12 per sequence of poetry) can be made by clicking this link: https://store.lboro.ac.uk/myaccount/?modid=2&compid=1

Hard copy entries must be accompanied by a cheque to: Overton Poetry Prize, FAO: Roxy Winterborne, NN0009, School of the Arts, English and Drama, Martin Hall, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU.

Closing date for the competition is Tuesday 31st May 2016.

Overton Poetry Prize Winner Launch Night

Overton_Signpost_2016Winner of the 2015 Overton Poetry Prize, Sarah Leavesley, will have her poetry chapbook officially launched at an event on Tuesday 15th March.

Sarah’s chapbook, titled Lampshades & Glass Rivers, has been published as part of an annual competition presented by the School of the Arts, English and Drama.

The launch event will include readings by the School’s current poet-in-residence, Helen Calcutt, PhD Creative Writing student, Sophie Louise-Hyde, MA Creative Writing student, Naomi Riley-Dudley and, third-year English undergraduate student, Maggie Nash.

The Overton Poetry Prize invites students explore their creativity and submit a sequence of poetry of up to 300 lines on any subject. The winning sequence will be published by Lamplight Press, based at the University, with the two runners-up receiving a £50 book voucher.

The launch of Lampshades & Glass Rivers will take place between 7-8.30pm in the Stanley Evernden Studio, School of the Arts, English and Drama. Entrance is free and refreshments will be provided.

To be in with a chance of having your own work published, click here and enter the Overton Poetry Prize 2016 before entry closes on 30th April.

Student Book Club – Small But Perfectly Formed!

18498569The Student Book Club meets again before the Easter vacation starts when the novel under the literary microscope will be Jessie Burton’s award-winning historical novel The Miniaturist.

We’ll be meeting at the usual time of 7pm in the Library Staff Room on Monday 14th March. Copies of the book are available to borrow from the Level 3 User Services Desk – just ask a member of staff for a copy.

For more information about the Club, please contact Sharon Reid at the Library: S.D.Reid@lboro.ac.uk, ext. 222403, or why not join the discussion on our Facebook page?