Database Trial – Victorian Popular Culture

Take a trip back in time to the smoky world of music halls and circus tents with our latest database trial courtesy of Adam Matthew Digital.

Victorian Popular Culture is a portal comprised of four modules, inviting users into the darkened halls, small backrooms, big tops and travelling venues that hosted everything from spectacular shows and bawdy burlesque, to the world of magic, spiritualist séances, optical entertainments and the first moving pictures…

To begin searching go to www.victorianpopularculture.amdigital.co.uk

Access is via IP address and the trial runs to 15th December 2017. Please note that PDF download options are not available during this  trial.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, please contact Steve Corn – s.c.corn@lboro.ac.uk  – with your comments.

Weekend of Weird at the Martin Hall

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LU Arts is remaining in the Halloween spirit this November with a weekend long exploration of everything Weird, hosted in the Martin Hall Theatre on Saturday 26th & Sunday 27th November.

A Weekend of Weird brings together writers, performers, filmmakers, artists, publishers, academics, enthusiasts and celebrants to ask: what is the Weird? Where did it come from? Where is it going?

The Weird is an emerging field that encompasses literature, film, music, art and performance. Its world is subtly strange, uncanny, irrational, inexplicable, questioning our everyday environments and perceptions and implying that our world is far more bizarre and disturbing than we would like to believe.

The weekend will comprise panel discussions, live performances, film screenings and a specialist book fair. It is organised by Radar in collaboration with Nick Freeman and Dan Watt from Loughborough University’s School of the Arts, English and Drama.

A Weekend of Weird centres around a series of main panel discussions with contributions from John Hirschhorn-Smith, Andrew Michael Hurley, Timothy Jarvis, James Machin and Mark Valentine. These sessions will be interspersed with live performances and a series of specially curated film programmes.

For this programme Radar has commissioned new works by Joey Holder, Ben Judd, Tai Shani and artist collective Reactor. There will also be screenings of work by Sidsel Christensen and Pauline Curnier Jardin.

Full programme information can be found on the LU Arts website here:

http://www.arts.lboro.ac.uk/radar/events/event/a_weekend_of_weird

Database Trial: Eighteenth Century Drama

d218d8635edd40fbb240ce7560974acfThis month we’re trialling an Adam Matthew resource that should be of much interest to English & Drama students or anybody interested in the history of British theatre.

Eighteenth Century Drama features the John Larpent Collection from the Huntington Library – a unique archive of almost every play submitted for licence between 1737 and 1824, as well as hundreds of documents that provide social context for the plays. Explore the Larpent plays, papers of prominent theatrical figures of the period, including correspondence, financial documents, and portraits. Cross-reference this with essential searchable databases created from information in The London Stage 1729-1800 and A Biographical Dictionary of Actors, Actresses, Musicians, Dancers, Managers Other Stage Personnel in London, 1660-1800.

To begin searching please go to: www.eighteenthcenturydrama.amdigital.co.uk – access is via IP address and the trial runs to 17th June 2016.

NB: Please note that PDF download options are not available during trials.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, please contact Steve Corn.

Go Punk at the British Library This Summer

blRelieve the halcyon days of the darker side of the 1977 Silver Jubilee at the British Library’s new free exhibition celebrating 40 years of a cultural phenomenon which is enduring as strong as ever, Punk 1976-78.

Starting with the impact of the Sex Pistols in 1976, the exhibition explores punk’s early days in the capital and reveals how its remarkable influence spread across music, fashion, print and graphic styles nationwide.

Showcasing a range of fanzines, flyers, recordings and record sleeves from the British Library’s collections alongside rare material from the archives held at Liverpool John Moores University, including items from England’s Dreaming: The Jon Savage Archive, it celebrates the enduring influence of punk as a radical musical, artistic and political movement.

The exhibition is being hosted in the Library’s main entrance hall and runs until October 2nd. For further details visit the British Library site.

Please note that the exhibition contains adult content.

Freefest 2016

Cg5T7tAWgAAKdDeDon’t want to be stuck in the Library revising this Bank Holiday? Then why not spend the day down at the Student Union for Freefest 2016 and listen to great music instead!

Listen to music by local bands and acts, join in at the acoustic stage or get raving at the DJ arena! During the day as well student circus society Fever will show off their talent and you can even join in to learn some skills yourself! Pole Fitness and LSU Break Dance will be taking care of the dance performances for the day, with a guest appearance by the Nottingham Portland Underground Pandas for a chilled out break dance jam in the sun.

Add to this a charity beer and cider festival, a student art sale and a vintage fair and there’s no need to spend the day anywhere else than at the LSU. If we weren’t open, we’d all be down there as well!

This event is just the start of a weeklong of amazing activities, so please have a look at the full programme below and join in with more events this week.

http://www.arts.lboro.ac.uk/calendar/event/freefest_2016/

Shakespeare in Ten Acts at the British Library

blThis week the British Library is inviting people to join them on a journey through 400 years of history – from the first productions of Hamlet and The Tempest – to understand how Shakespeare’s plays have been transformed for new generations of theatre-goers.

Shakespeare in Ten Acts showcases over 200 unique and rare items such as the only surviving play-script in Shakespeare’s hand, an authentic Shakespeare signature, the earliest printed edition of Hamlet from 1603 and Shakespeare’s First Folio.

Complementing the exhibition is a new online learning resource, Discovering Literature: Shakespeare. Whether you’re a student, teacher, researcher, or simply a lover of literature, Discovering Literature: Shakespeare will encourage critical thinking and independent learning to enrich your understanding of all-things Shakespeare.

The exhibition runs until September 6th. For more details, visit the link below:

http://www.bl.uk/events/shakespeare-in-ten-acts

West Africa – Word, Symbol & Song at the British Library

blA major new exhibition, West Africa: Word, Symbol & Song, begins at the British Library from today, celebrating the cultural dynamism of West Africa, from early symbolic scripts and illuminated manuscripts, to the writings of Wole Soyinka and the music of Afrobeat legend Fela Kuti.

From the great manuscript libraries of the early Middle Ages, through to colonialism and independence right up to the writers and artists working in the present day, West Africa has a powerful literary, artistic and musical heritage.

The exhibition traces a thousand years of this history, drawing on over 200 stunning manuscripts, books, sound and film recordings as well as artworks, masks and colourful textiles from the British Library’s vast African collections and beyond, offering an insight into the centuries-old written heritage, as well as the ancient oral traditions of West Africa, both of which continue to influence and inspire in the present day.

The exhibition, which runs through until 16th February, will be accompanied by a major series of talks, events and performances. For further details, visit the British Library website here.

Want to Know What Was on TV on the Day You Were Born…?

Radio Times by Bradford TimelineThe BBC this week launched a new online service that allows you to search through complete schedules of their seminal listings magazine, Radio Times.

The Genome Project has digitised listings from nearly 4,500 issues that cover everything broadcast by the BBC on their radio and television channels between the years 1923 to 2009, and though at present the database only contains basic information such as capsule synopsis and programme details and a brief cast/credit list, they aim to include images later.

Nearly 4.5 million programmes are covered, including old favorites such as Doctor Who, Fawlty Towers, Monty Python – and Crackerjack! – along with details of the BBC’s coverage of major sporting and historical events including Olympic Games, World Cups and Moon landings. So now you can find out what was on TV the day you were born!

Although ITV listings are not included owing to copyright issues, you can access an archive of the TV Times, ITV’s ‘answer’ to Radio Times, by visiting the BUFVC database’s TV Times listing archive, which covers the period 1955-1985 (please note you will need your Athens username & password to access this service).

Radio Times cover by Bradford Timeline, reproduced under CC License from Flickr.

Terror at the British Library

British_20Library_20LogoHalloween has started early at the British Library this October, as they open their vaults to a spooky new exhibition entitled Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination.

From the literary nightmares of Mary Shelley and Bram Stoker to the screen perils of Stanley Kubrick and Hammer horror films, over 200 rare objects chart 250 years of the Gothic tradition, exploring our enduring fascination with the mysterious, the terrifying and the macabre, detailing how the genre has cast a dark shadow across film, art, music, fashion, architecture and every day life.

Iconic works such as handwritten drafts of the classics Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Bram Stoker’s Dracula, as well as the more contemporary horrors of Clive Barker’s Hellraiser and the Twilight saga, are included in the exhibition, which runs through until 20th January. Full booking details are available via the British Library website here:

http://www.bl.uk/whatson/exhibitions/gothic/index.html

Photographic Youth Music Culture Archive (PYMCA) Trial

pymca logo

Between now and December we’re trialling a unique on-line social history and youth culture database that may prove of much interest to social scientists, artists and historians alike.

The Photographic Youth Music Culture Archive (PYMCA) is a specialist resource featuring over 40,000 exclusive photographs, moving images, texts, graphics, digital magazines and supplementary research. With insight materials covering the last 150 years of youth culture, youth tribes and social history, PYMCA is an essential educational resource for many HE and FE subject areas from media to fashion, music to history, social sciences and much more.

To access the database please go to www.pymca.com  – when prompted follow the ‘Login via your home institution’ link, choose Loughborough University from the drop-down menu & input your Athens username and password.

We would welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, so please contact Steve Corn  with any comments you would care to make.