Want to Know What Was on TV on the Day You Were Born…?

Radio Times by Bradford TimelineThe BBC this week launched a new online service that allows you to search through complete schedules of their seminal listings magazine, Radio Times.

The Genome Project has digitised listings from nearly 4,500 issues that cover everything broadcast by the BBC on their radio and television channels between the years 1923 to 2009, and though at present the database only contains basic information such as capsule synopsis and programme details and a brief cast/credit list, they aim to include images later.

Nearly 4.5 million programmes are covered, including old favorites such as Doctor Who, Fawlty Towers, Monty Python – and Crackerjack! – along with details of the BBC’s coverage of major sporting and historical events including Olympic Games, World Cups and Moon landings. So now you can find out what was on TV the day you were born!

Although ITV listings are not included owing to copyright issues, you can access an archive of the TV Times, ITV’s ‘answer’ to Radio Times, by visiting the BUFVC database’s TV Times listing archive, which covers the period 1955-1985 (please note you will need your Athens username & password to access this service).

Radio Times cover by Bradford Timeline, reproduced under CC License from Flickr.

Man Booker Prize 2014 Winner Announced

richard flanagan by anetzCongratulations to Australian author Richard Flanagan (pictured) who last night won the prestigious £50,000 Man Booker Prize for his stirring wartime novel The Narrow Road to the Deep North.

The selection for this year’s prize caused some controversy when the competition was opened to all authors writing in English, provoking many to believe that the contest would be dominated by American authors, who were previously excluded; though ultimately this year’s shortlist included only two Americans, along with three British and one Australian.

We’ll be getting a copy of Flanagan’s novel in due course, but we do already have a growing selection of previous Booker winners and nominees among our Leisure Reading section on Level 4, including last year’s winner The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton. Why not pop upstairs and have a browse?

Richard Flanagan image by Anetz, reproduced under CC License from Flickr.

Welcome to Loughborough’s New Poet in Residence…

7742154_origLoughborough English, Drama and Publishing is proud to announce the arrival of their new Poet in Residence, Sarah Kelly.

Sarah Kelly is an interdisciplinary artist and poet primarily concerned with text and surface. She is co-editor of AlbaLondres (journal for poetry in translation). Her work explores embodied process in language making and marking and encompasses poetic practice, sculptural page and paper making, somatic movement, typographic and calligraphic inscription, translation and iteration.

Based on the proceeds from the Overton Poetry Prize, and the generous contributions to ‘Just Giving’, the School have been able to ask Sarah Kelly to work with them as their ‘Poet in Residence’ over the next year.

Sarah will be running some workshops and some ‘open-door’ sessions with the students during the coming year, as well as giving a research seminar and judging this year’s Overton Poetry Prize.

For more information visit the artist’s website here.

Terror at the British Library

British_20Library_20LogoHalloween has started early at the British Library this October, as they open their vaults to a spooky new exhibition entitled Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination.

From the literary nightmares of Mary Shelley and Bram Stoker to the screen perils of Stanley Kubrick and Hammer horror films, over 200 rare objects chart 250 years of the Gothic tradition, exploring our enduring fascination with the mysterious, the terrifying and the macabre, detailing how the genre has cast a dark shadow across film, art, music, fashion, architecture and every day life.

Iconic works such as handwritten drafts of the classics Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Bram Stoker’s Dracula, as well as the more contemporary horrors of Clive Barker’s Hellraiser and the Twilight saga, are included in the exhibition, which runs through until 20th January. Full booking details are available via the British Library website here:

http://www.bl.uk/whatson/exhibitions/gothic/index.html

To Hell With Culture at the Cope

1035On Wednesday 3rd September (6-7pm) the Cope Auditorium will be presenting a free screening of To Hell with Culture, a portrait of the life and work of Herbert Read, which will be followed by a discussion with the film’s director Huw Wahl, Benedict Read and Dr Michael Paraskos of the Department of Politics, History & International Relations.

Co-founder of the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA), Herbert Read (1893-1968) was an influential art critic, poet and anarchist. In his 1943 essay, To Hell with Culture, Read laid out his ideas for a civilisation based on cooperation, in which culture would no longer be a commodity separated from society, but an integral part of everyday life. In this film director Huw Wahl engages in conversations with artists, poets, curators, historians and Herbert Read’s children, to ask how we can apply Read’s ideas and approaches to the commodification of culture in our contemporary society. This immersive portrayal of Read’s life and work includes unseen archival material of Herbert Read, his poetry and film of the North Yorkshire landscape where he was born.

Tickets are free, but booking is necessary via this link:

http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/to-hell-with-culture-tickets-11827545507

Don’t Just Relax With a Book – Relax ON a Book!

photo (23)The National Literacy Trust have just begun a leisure reading scheme that gives the expression ‘settling down with a good book’ a whole new meaning, as they have installed a range of benches across London designed after popular literary classics such as Peter Pan, Bridget Jones and James Bond.

In association with Wild at Art the Trust’s Books About Town scheme features a trail of benches shaped as open books, decorated by professional illustrators and local artists, allowing visitors an opportunity to explore and celebrate the capital’s literary connections and the whole idea of reading for pleasure, whilst enjoying the artwork of some of the country’s top artists – in a very novel way!

We do our bit to promote leisure reading here at the Library too, though our furniture is a little more ordinary, alas! We have a wide (and ever expanding!) range of popular fiction, autobiographies and graphic novels upstairs on Level 4 (pictured above is only a small sample of our collection!). So if you’re stuck for something to read over the long, drowsy summer days (and nights), why not pop upstairs and have a browse?

Visit Inner Worlds at the Loughborough Town Hall…

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Art lovers and fans of the science fiction dystopias of writers J.G. Ballard and Philip K. Dick are in for a treat at a new exhibition that has just opened at the Sock Gallery in Loughborough Town Hall.

For Inner Worlds: Tech Noir and The Gothic Leicester-based artist and photographer Wayne Mitchelson transforms the gallery into a strange and interesting world inspired by the novels of Philip K. Dick, J.G. Ballard and Edgar Allen Poe using digital photographic prints and hand drawn murals. Wayne will be drawing between the spaces of some of his photographs to create his own visual story and you the viewer are invited to watch him at work, as each photograph connects and the “Inner Worlds” emerge.

The exhibition runs for a month from today until 3rd August. For further details visit the Loughborough Town Hall site here.

Enduring War at the British Library

British_20Library_20LogoA new exhibition has just opened at the British Library as part of their contribution to the First World War Centenary. Enduring War examines how people coped with life during the war: from moments of patriotic fervour to periods of anxious inactivity, shock and despair. 

Through posters, poetry, books and pamphlets from the period, the exhibition considers attempts to boost morale at home and in the field, as well as presenting individual responses to the conflict, such as letters from Indian soldiers on the Western Front, schoolboys’ descriptions of Zeppelin raids over London and examples of the black humour expressed in trench journals.

The exhibition also showcases the Library’s work for Europeana 1914-1918, a major pan-European project to digitise more than 400,000 items from World War One through an audiovisual art installation, as well as a new World War One website, in which the user can explore over 500 newly-digitised historical sources from across Europe, with new insights by experts.

Enduring War is now open until October in the Library’s Folio Gallery and is free to visit. For further details visit the British Library website here.

Face to Little Face with Club 790

littlefacereallybig_indexClub 790, our own student book club, meets up for the last time time this academic year next Wednesday (11th June) in the Library at 5.30pm, when the book under discussion will be Sophie Hannah’s unsettling crime thriller, Little Face.

Club 790 meets up every six weeks during term time in the Library. It costs nothing to join and all books will be provided free-of-charge (although we do ask that you return the books to us after the meeting). All you have to do is read the book and turn up!

For more information email Sharon Reid: S.D.Reid@lboro.ac.uk, or why not join our Facebook page?

Maya Angelou 1928-2014

maya angelou by york collegeAmerican author, poet and civil rights beacon Maya Angelou died today aged 86.

Best known for her best-selling autobiographical account of her childhood and early youth in 1930′s America, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, first published in 1969, Maya Angelou became a role model for the burgeoning Civil Rights movement in the US, in a career that also spanned writing, acting and music. She was a friend of both Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, and later wrote poetry for President Bill Clinton’s inauguration and in commemoration of the death of Nelson Mandela last year.

We have a variety of Maya Angelou’s works in our literature collection on Level 2, including I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, and you can found out more about her extraordinary life and works by browsing our extensive collection of newspaper archives available on Library Catalogue Plus.

Maya Angelou portrait by York College, reproduced under CC License from Flickr.