Women Writers Online Free for Women’s History Month

wwoMarch is Women’s History Month, and to mark the occasion the Northeastern University Women Writers Project have made their Women Writers Online database freely available throughout the month of March.

Women Writers Online now contains more than 350 texts published between 1526 and 1850, including new works by Aphra Behn, Charlotte Turner Smith, and Mercy Otis Warren. If you are interested in any aspect of women’s writing in English between 1526 and 1800, you will find texts and contexts here in abundance — including some that are new since last year.

You can access the database via this link:

http://wwo.wwp.northeastern.edu/WWO

Women’s History Month takes place every March and is run by the National Women’s History Project. Every year features a new theme, and this year the theme is ‘Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives’. To find out more, visit the NWHP home page here:

http://www.nwhp.org/

Student Book Club March Meeting

9780141028590The Student Book Club meets again in March when the book up for consideration this time will be Sathnam Sanghera’s life-affirming Black Country drama The Boy with the Topknot. We’ll be meeting in the Library Staffroom on Monday March 9th at 7pm – just ask at the Level 3 desk for directions.

All copies of the book have now been borrowed for the meeting, but you can still purchase it for your Kindle or from local booksellers.

For more information, please contact Sharon Reid at the Library: S.D.Reid@lboro.ac.uk, ext. 222403, or why not join the discussion on our Facebook page?

Speech Bubble Returns

1958199_531061097007542_1135064194_nSpeech Bubble, Loughborough University Arts’ popular open-mic spoken word event, returns to the Student Union on Monday 1st December.

Headlining the evening will be cult performance poet and musician Attila the Stockbroker, supported, as always on Speech Bubble nights, by the very finest student wordsmiths that campus can offer.

The night kicks off at 7.30pm in the Cognito Bar in the SU Building. Admission is free to students and £3 for visitors.

T.S. Eliot on Trial

project museEnglish students and literature lovers alike may wish to partake of our latest database trial which allows complete online access to the prose works of one of the most famous writers in English literature.

The Complete Prose of T. S. Eliot gathers for the first time in one place the collected, uncollected, and unpublished prose of one of the most prolific writers of the twentieth century. The result of a multi-year collaboration among Eliot’s Estate, Faber and Faber Ltd., Johns Hopkins University Press, the Beck Digital Center of Emory University, and the Institute of English Studies, University of London, this eight-volume critical edition dramatically expands access to material that has been restricted or inaccessible in private and institutional collections for almost fifty years.

To begin searching please go to : http://muse.jhu.edu/about/reference/eliot/index.html   – access is via IP address. This trial runs until 19th December.

We’d welcome feedback – good or bad! – on this trial. Please contact Steve Corn with your comments.

Want to Know What Was on TV on the Day You Were Born…?

Radio Times by Bradford TimelineThe BBC this week launched a new online service that allows you to search through complete schedules of their seminal listings magazine, Radio Times.

The Genome Project has digitised listings from nearly 4,500 issues that cover everything broadcast by the BBC on their radio and television channels between the years 1923 to 2009, and though at present the database only contains basic information such as capsule synopsis and programme details and a brief cast/credit list, they aim to include images later.

Nearly 4.5 million programmes are covered, including old favorites such as Doctor Who, Fawlty Towers, Monty Python – and Crackerjack! – along with details of the BBC’s coverage of major sporting and historical events including Olympic Games, World Cups and Moon landings. So now you can find out what was on TV the day you were born!

Although ITV listings are not included owing to copyright issues, you can access an archive of the TV Times, ITV’s ‘answer’ to Radio Times, by visiting the BUFVC database’s TV Times listing archive, which covers the period 1955-1985 (please note you will need your Athens username & password to access this service).

Radio Times cover by Bradford Timeline, reproduced under CC License from Flickr.

Man Booker Prize 2014 Winner Announced

richard flanagan by anetzCongratulations to Australian author Richard Flanagan (pictured) who last night won the prestigious £50,000 Man Booker Prize for his stirring wartime novel The Narrow Road to the Deep North.

The selection for this year’s prize caused some controversy when the competition was opened to all authors writing in English, provoking many to believe that the contest would be dominated by American authors, who were previously excluded; though ultimately this year’s shortlist included only two Americans, along with three British and one Australian.

We’ll be getting a copy of Flanagan’s novel in due course, but we do already have a growing selection of previous Booker winners and nominees among our Leisure Reading section on Level 4, including last year’s winner The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton. Why not pop upstairs and have a browse?

Richard Flanagan image by Anetz, reproduced under CC License from Flickr.

Welcome to Loughborough’s New Poet in Residence…

7742154_origLoughborough English, Drama and Publishing is proud to announce the arrival of their new Poet in Residence, Sarah Kelly.

Sarah Kelly is an interdisciplinary artist and poet primarily concerned with text and surface. She is co-editor of AlbaLondres (journal for poetry in translation). Her work explores embodied process in language making and marking and encompasses poetic practice, sculptural page and paper making, somatic movement, typographic and calligraphic inscription, translation and iteration.

Based on the proceeds from the Overton Poetry Prize, and the generous contributions to ‘Just Giving’, the School have been able to ask Sarah Kelly to work with them as their ‘Poet in Residence’ over the next year.

Sarah will be running some workshops and some ‘open-door’ sessions with the students during the coming year, as well as giving a research seminar and judging this year’s Overton Poetry Prize.

For more information visit the artist’s website here.

Terror at the British Library

British_20Library_20LogoHalloween has started early at the British Library this October, as they open their vaults to a spooky new exhibition entitled Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination.

From the literary nightmares of Mary Shelley and Bram Stoker to the screen perils of Stanley Kubrick and Hammer horror films, over 200 rare objects chart 250 years of the Gothic tradition, exploring our enduring fascination with the mysterious, the terrifying and the macabre, detailing how the genre has cast a dark shadow across film, art, music, fashion, architecture and every day life.

Iconic works such as handwritten drafts of the classics Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Bram Stoker’s Dracula, as well as the more contemporary horrors of Clive Barker’s Hellraiser and the Twilight saga, are included in the exhibition, which runs through until 20th January. Full booking details are available via the British Library website here:

http://www.bl.uk/whatson/exhibitions/gothic/index.html

To Hell With Culture at the Cope

1035On Wednesday 3rd September (6-7pm) the Cope Auditorium will be presenting a free screening of To Hell with Culture, a portrait of the life and work of Herbert Read, which will be followed by a discussion with the film’s director Huw Wahl, Benedict Read and Dr Michael Paraskos of the Department of Politics, History & International Relations.

Co-founder of the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA), Herbert Read (1893-1968) was an influential art critic, poet and anarchist. In his 1943 essay, To Hell with Culture, Read laid out his ideas for a civilisation based on cooperation, in which culture would no longer be a commodity separated from society, but an integral part of everyday life. In this film director Huw Wahl engages in conversations with artists, poets, curators, historians and Herbert Read’s children, to ask how we can apply Read’s ideas and approaches to the commodification of culture in our contemporary society. This immersive portrayal of Read’s life and work includes unseen archival material of Herbert Read, his poetry and film of the North Yorkshire landscape where he was born.

Tickets are free, but booking is necessary via this link:

http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/to-hell-with-culture-tickets-11827545507

Don’t Just Relax With a Book – Relax ON a Book!

photo (23)The National Literacy Trust have just begun a leisure reading scheme that gives the expression ‘settling down with a good book’ a whole new meaning, as they have installed a range of benches across London designed after popular literary classics such as Peter Pan, Bridget Jones and James Bond.

In association with Wild at Art the Trust’s Books About Town scheme features a trail of benches shaped as open books, decorated by professional illustrators and local artists, allowing visitors an opportunity to explore and celebrate the capital’s literary connections and the whole idea of reading for pleasure, whilst enjoying the artwork of some of the country’s top artists – in a very novel way!

We do our bit to promote leisure reading here at the Library too, though our furniture is a little more ordinary, alas! We have a wide (and ever expanding!) range of popular fiction, autobiographies and graphic novels upstairs on Level 4 (pictured above is only a small sample of our collection!). So if you’re stuck for something to read over the long, drowsy summer days (and nights), why not pop upstairs and have a browse?