Database Trial – Accessible Archives

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The Library is trialling a well-established resource this month that may be of great interest to social sciences students and historians in particular.

Accessible Archives was founded in 1990 with the goal of utilizing computer technology to make available vast quantities of archived historical information, previously furnished only in micro-format, hard copy form or as images only. In pursuit of this vision, primary source material has been selected to reflect a broad view of the times, and has been assembled into databases with a strict attention to detail allowing access to specific information with pinpoint accuracy.  Their online full-text search capability and digital imaging permits the user to search and manipulate this information in ways never before possible.

To begin searching please go to: http://www.accessible-archives.com/ . Access is via IP address and the trial runs to 13th May 2015.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial. Please contact Steve Corn s.c.corn@lboro.ac.uk with your comments.

Sir Terry Pratchett 1948-2015

terry pratchett by robin zebrowskiImmensely popular and influential fantasy author Sir Terry Pratchett sadly died yesterday aged 66 following a long illness.

His first novel, The Carpet People, was published in 1971, though it wasn’t until 1983 and the publication of The Colour of Magic, the first in his popular and long running Discworld saga, that his popularity began to soar, and he became a full-time writer in 1987, writing over 70 books, many of which were successfully translated and adapted into radio, television, film and computer games.

In 2007 he announced that he was suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease, and he became a spokesman for the treatment of dementia illness, recording a BAFTA award-winning documentary about the treatment of his illness in 2009, the same year that he received a knighthood for services to literature.

Sir Terry’s work is well represented among our own English literature and Leisure Reading collections.

Sir Terry Pratchett image by Robin Zebrowski, reproduced under CC License from Flickr.

Women Writers Online Free for Women’s History Month

wwoMarch is Women’s History Month, and to mark the occasion the Northeastern University Women Writers Project have made their Women Writers Online database freely available throughout the month of March.

Women Writers Online now contains more than 350 texts published between 1526 and 1850, including new works by Aphra Behn, Charlotte Turner Smith, and Mercy Otis Warren. If you are interested in any aspect of women’s writing in English between 1526 and 1800, you will find texts and contexts here in abundance — including some that are new since last year.

You can access the database via this link:

http://wwo.wwp.northeastern.edu/WWO

Women’s History Month takes place every March and is run by the National Women’s History Project. Every year features a new theme, and this year the theme is ‘Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives’. To find out more, visit the NWHP home page here:

http://www.nwhp.org/

Student Book Club March Meeting

9780141028590The Student Book Club meets again in March when the book up for consideration this time will be Sathnam Sanghera’s life-affirming Black Country drama The Boy with the Topknot. We’ll be meeting in the Library Staffroom on Monday March 9th at 7pm – just ask at the Level 3 desk for directions.

All copies of the book have now been borrowed for the meeting, but you can still purchase it for your Kindle or from local booksellers.

For more information, please contact Sharon Reid at the Library: S.D.Reid@lboro.ac.uk, ext. 222403, or why not join the discussion on our Facebook page?

Speech Bubble Returns

1958199_531061097007542_1135064194_nSpeech Bubble, Loughborough University Arts’ popular open-mic spoken word event, returns to the Student Union on Monday 1st December.

Headlining the evening will be cult performance poet and musician Attila the Stockbroker, supported, as always on Speech Bubble nights, by the very finest student wordsmiths that campus can offer.

The night kicks off at 7.30pm in the Cognito Bar in the SU Building. Admission is free to students and £3 for visitors.

T.S. Eliot on Trial

project museEnglish students and literature lovers alike may wish to partake of our latest database trial which allows complete online access to the prose works of one of the most famous writers in English literature.

The Complete Prose of T. S. Eliot gathers for the first time in one place the collected, uncollected, and unpublished prose of one of the most prolific writers of the twentieth century. The result of a multi-year collaboration among Eliot’s Estate, Faber and Faber Ltd., Johns Hopkins University Press, the Beck Digital Center of Emory University, and the Institute of English Studies, University of London, this eight-volume critical edition dramatically expands access to material that has been restricted or inaccessible in private and institutional collections for almost fifty years.

To begin searching please go to : http://muse.jhu.edu/about/reference/eliot/index.html   – access is via IP address. This trial runs until 19th December.

We’d welcome feedback – good or bad! – on this trial. Please contact Steve Corn with your comments.

Want to Know What Was on TV on the Day You Were Born…?

Radio Times by Bradford TimelineThe BBC this week launched a new online service that allows you to search through complete schedules of their seminal listings magazine, Radio Times.

The Genome Project has digitised listings from nearly 4,500 issues that cover everything broadcast by the BBC on their radio and television channels between the years 1923 to 2009, and though at present the database only contains basic information such as capsule synopsis and programme details and a brief cast/credit list, they aim to include images later.

Nearly 4.5 million programmes are covered, including old favorites such as Doctor Who, Fawlty Towers, Monty Python – and Crackerjack! – along with details of the BBC’s coverage of major sporting and historical events including Olympic Games, World Cups and Moon landings. So now you can find out what was on TV the day you were born!

Although ITV listings are not included owing to copyright issues, you can access an archive of the TV Times, ITV’s ‘answer’ to Radio Times, by visiting the BUFVC database’s TV Times listing archive, which covers the period 1955-1985 (please note you will need your Athens username & password to access this service).

Radio Times cover by Bradford Timeline, reproduced under CC License from Flickr.

Man Booker Prize 2014 Winner Announced

richard flanagan by anetzCongratulations to Australian author Richard Flanagan (pictured) who last night won the prestigious £50,000 Man Booker Prize for his stirring wartime novel The Narrow Road to the Deep North.

The selection for this year’s prize caused some controversy when the competition was opened to all authors writing in English, provoking many to believe that the contest would be dominated by American authors, who were previously excluded; though ultimately this year’s shortlist included only two Americans, along with three British and one Australian.

We’ll be getting a copy of Flanagan’s novel in due course, but we do already have a growing selection of previous Booker winners and nominees among our Leisure Reading section on Level 4, including last year’s winner The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton. Why not pop upstairs and have a browse?

Richard Flanagan image by Anetz, reproduced under CC License from Flickr.

Welcome to Loughborough’s New Poet in Residence…

7742154_origLoughborough English, Drama and Publishing is proud to announce the arrival of their new Poet in Residence, Sarah Kelly.

Sarah Kelly is an interdisciplinary artist and poet primarily concerned with text and surface. She is co-editor of AlbaLondres (journal for poetry in translation). Her work explores embodied process in language making and marking and encompasses poetic practice, sculptural page and paper making, somatic movement, typographic and calligraphic inscription, translation and iteration.

Based on the proceeds from the Overton Poetry Prize, and the generous contributions to ‘Just Giving’, the School have been able to ask Sarah Kelly to work with them as their ‘Poet in Residence’ over the next year.

Sarah will be running some workshops and some ‘open-door’ sessions with the students during the coming year, as well as giving a research seminar and judging this year’s Overton Poetry Prize.

For more information visit the artist’s website here.

Terror at the British Library

British_20Library_20LogoHalloween has started early at the British Library this October, as they open their vaults to a spooky new exhibition entitled Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination.

From the literary nightmares of Mary Shelley and Bram Stoker to the screen perils of Stanley Kubrick and Hammer horror films, over 200 rare objects chart 250 years of the Gothic tradition, exploring our enduring fascination with the mysterious, the terrifying and the macabre, detailing how the genre has cast a dark shadow across film, art, music, fashion, architecture and every day life.

Iconic works such as handwritten drafts of the classics Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Bram Stoker’s Dracula, as well as the more contemporary horrors of Clive Barker’s Hellraiser and the Twilight saga, are included in the exhibition, which runs through until 20th January. Full booking details are available via the British Library website here:

http://www.bl.uk/whatson/exhibitions/gothic/index.html