School of Business and Economics

Research blog from the School of Business and Economics

Blog

blog photo

20 years in tech

I was a PhD student in Manchester when a robotics lab was opened in the Department of Computer Science. It was 1997, or thereabouts. The robot itself was not as impressive as I had anticipated. It looked like an upturned waste-paper basket with wheels. Its task was to learn to navigate through the department’s first […]






Exploring the concept of an operating model

The concept of an operating model has come to the fore in operations management research in the last five years. Much of the available material about operating model is published by consultancies and there has been little academic focus on the definition of an operating model. In the recently published paper, Operating Model: An Exploration […]






Resisting the visual: Why academia is still resistant to the power of imagery in learning

Introduction This blog is about academic resistance to a good idea. It’s not uncommon that good practices sometimes prompt people to reject them, but that’s different from the other things I’ve talked about in earlier blogs, like being unaware of the problems associated with the ways we often use our primary projection platform, PowerPoint. Being […]






Dr Huw Edwards on the ‘Economists for Free Trade’ report

Economists for Free Trade: Extraordinary Claims Demand Extraordinary Evidence, but they have provided none. In discussing the ‘Economists for Free Trade’ (EFT) ‘report’, I am unfortunately unable to comment upon the numerical and modelling work in any depth, since no technical documents have, to date, been released. (The absence of serious data, model details or […]






Why the media is wrong about Brexit (it’s not about ‘hard’ or ‘soft’)

Professor Alistair Milne at the SBE has just written a new blog post for The UK in a Changing Europe, published today, about why the CBI are right in calling for an extended negotiation with the EU over Britain’s exit. He writes: “In a recent speech Carolyn Fairbairn and Rain Newton Smith of the Confederation […]






Mark Hepworth i3 Conference memorial award

  The Mark Hepworth i3 Conference memorial award was ‘unveiled’ at the 2017 i3 Research Conference, Information: interactions and impact, Aberdeen Business School, Robert Gordon University (RGU) 27th June 2017. Professor Peter Reid (right), Professor of Librarianship and Information Management at RGU, and Professor Graham Matthews (left), representing the Information Management Group at Loughborough University’s School […]






What digital technologies mean for India’s largest anti-poverty programme

According to the UN’s New Sustainable Development Agenda, state-level anti-poverty programmes are a core building block of global strategies for poverty alleviation. The notion of anti-poverty programmes encompasses all the schemes protecting the poor and vulnerable from food insecurity, lack of sustainable livelihoods, and all the problems that income poverty entails. These programmes take different […]






Write your way to enhanced wellbeing

One evening recently whilst I was chilling in front of the TV, glass of wine in hand, reflecting on the past challenging week and feeling relieved it was finally the weekend, a Facebook message suddenly popped up. A friend had included me in a Facebook group as she had news to share, news which she warned […]






Brexit negotiations: Turning points and concessions

This Blog post was originally published on The UK in a Changing Europe website on 28th June 2017. The concessions from the UK side on the sequencing of the talks on the opening of negotiations on 19 June was hardly surprising given the developments relating to the UK election on June 8. Conducted in an […]






Teaching dyslexic students: The power of images

INTRODUCTION It should come as no surprise that the number of dyslexic students entering Higher Education (HE) has increased in line with the widening participation agenda that has accompanied neoliberal hegemonic domination of academic praxis.  That number has risen dramatically over the last two decades, from approximately 2,000 in 1994 to more than 20,000 in […]