School of Business and Economics

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20 years in tech

I was a PhD student in Manchester when a robotics lab was opened in the Department of Computer Science. It was 1997, or thereabouts. The robot itself was not as impressive as I had anticipated. It looked like an upturned waste-paper basket with wheels. Its task was to learn to navigate through the department’s first […]






Mark Hepworth i3 Conference memorial award

  The Mark Hepworth i3 Conference memorial award was ‘unveiled’ at the 2017 i3 Research Conference, Information: interactions and impact, Aberdeen Business School, Robert Gordon University (RGU) 27th June 2017. Professor Peter Reid (right), Professor of Librarianship and Information Management at RGU, and Professor Graham Matthews (left), representing the Information Management Group at Loughborough University’s School […]






Men more likely to use ‘ego-mail’ at work than women

Professor Tom Jackson is interviewed by The Telegraph in a recent article on the use of ‘ego-mail’ in the office, saying that men are more likely to engage in this behaviour than women. You can read the full article here: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/04/26/rise-ego-mail-office-workers-use-email-tactics-climb-career/?WT.mc_id=tmg_share_em Professor Tom Jackson is Director of the Centre for Information Management and a Professor of […]






On the management of creative professionals: A lesson from the Oliver Twins

When it comes to managing creative IT professionals, the Oliver Twins can teach us all a thing or two. As pioneers of the UK computer games industry and founders of ‘Radiant Worlds’, a thriving British games development company, Philip and Andrew Oliver have three decades’ experience of working with and managing games programmers and other […]






How our tool analysing emotions on Twitter predicted Donald Trump win

This Blog post consists of an excerpt from an article published in The Conversation on Wednesday, 9th November 2016. To read the full article, please go to: https://theconversation.com/how-our-tool-analysing-emotions-on-twitter-predicted-donald-trump-win-68522  How our tool analysing emotions on Twitter predicted Donald Trump win “As the world dissects the how and why of Donald Trump’s presidential victory, pollsters are already […]






An interview with Dermot Turing: Alan Turing’s nephew

We were delighted to welcome Sir John Dermot Turing to our Distinguished Speaker Series, organised by the Centre for Information Management at the SBE. Dermot is a solicitor and consultant with international law firm Clifford Chance, specialising in bank and investment firm regulation with several publications to his name in this area. He is also the nephew […]






Change feels good: Emotional agency in a digital business world

Emotion research is like doing particle physics in a mirage – it’s complex on a subatomic scale and vanishes upon closer inspection. Hold on, this is a business blog isn’t it? Is emotion even relevant ‘here’? Isn’t business concerned with rather more rational concepts? Here’s a rhetorical answer: Firstly, the original meaning of the very […]






How to be a great researcher!

Over recent months I have had some opportunities to speak on how to develop a research career.  Indeed, I presented on this topic recently at the Centre for Information Management’s conference; yesterday, January 12th, to be precise.  So for this blog post I thought I would outline some of the key messages from these talks. […]






The role of an editor

I found it an interesting experience when Taylor & Francis asked me for a blog posting about the role of an editor. Even though I have been editing academic journals (Health Information and Libraries Journal (1998 – 2004) and New Review of Academic Librarianship (2004 to date) for a while, I had never reflected on […]






Cyberchondria: How do we control the risks?

PhD student Becca Coates has written a piece about the increasing frequency for consumers to approach online sources about symptoms of illness, a process that has been described as ‘Cyberchondria’. Critics are increasingly questioning the quality of interactive health information in ‘The Age of Risk’. Research in this field is often concerned with a focus on […]