10,000th item added to Loughborough’s University’s Institutional Repository

We are delighted to announce that the 10,000th item has been added to Loughborough University’s Institutional Repository. The submitter of the 10,000th item was Vadim Silberschmidt, Professor of Mechanics of Materials in the School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering.

Vadim is pictured above receiving his prize – a festive hamper – from the University Librarian, Ruth Jenkins.

Professor Silberschmidt has over thirty journal articles and conference papers in the Institutional Repository. The winning submission, co-authored with PhD student Xianan Hou and Memis Acar, Professor of Mechanics, is available on the Repository at: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/dspace-jspui/handle/2134/10846

As one of the largest full-text university repositories in the UK, Loughborough’s Institutional Repository reflects a successful partnership between the Library and Academic Schools and Departments across the entire University. In 2012 the Repository was fully integrated with the University’s new publication information database, LUPIN, resulting in a 47% increase in submissions. Containing a range of items including full-text journal articles, conference papers, book chapters, official reports, PhD theses and audio-visual material, the Repository is an impressive online collection of the University’s research output. With the majority of items available on open access, centrally stored and preserved, the Repository ensures that Loughborough University’s research output is freely available to the wider research community, thus increasing its impact and citation rates.

For further information on the Institutional Repository and how to submit your publications via LUPIN, please see our web pages at:

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/services/library/online/repository/

Or contact us in the Library at 01509 222338 / 222363 or email repository@lboro.ac.uk

The Top Five Institutional Repository Downloads for July

“Summertime, and the research is easy…

The IR is jumpin’, and the downloads are high…”*

Here’s a run-down of the top five most downloaded items for July!

1.  Effect of preharvest UV-treatment on shelf life of fruits and vegetables by Matthew A. Obande (still holding steady at no.1 for another month with 142 downloads)

2. Graphic design as urban design: towards a theory for analysing graphic objects in urban environments by Robert Harland. (New entry with 110 downloads)

3. Discourse analysis means doing analysis: a critique of six analytic shortcomings by Charles Antaki, Michael Billig, Derek Edwards & Jonathan Potter (holding firm at no.3 with 86 downloads)

4. Protectionism to liberalisation : Ireland and the EEC, 1957 to 1966 by Maurice Fitzgerald (still stuck in the middle with you at no.4 with 78 downloads) 

5. Globalization, regionalization and cross-border regions: scales, discourses and governance  by Markus Perkmann and Ngai-Ling Sum (new entry with 56 downloads)

Our repository increases the visibility of Loughborough’s research and the materials within it are centrally stored and preserved. The material in the collection includes journal articles, book chapters, conference papers and theses. To find out more about it, and how you can submit your research, visit the IR homepage here.

(*With apologies to George Gershwin!) 

PhD Theses – digitisation project.

During July & August the Library’s print collection of University PhD theses will be digitised. This will mean that during these months some PhD theses will be unavailable while they are being digitised. We apologise for any inconvenience that this will cause but will try to ensure that titles are digitised as quickly as possible and then made available via the University’s Institutional Repository.

'Elevenses' in the Library

“Summer Elevenses”
Have your cake and eat it!
Research Summer School in the Library

Every Wednesday at 11 over the summer, why not down-tools and head over to the Library for a slice of cake and a morsel of research training. Come and network with colleagues whilst picking up a hint or tip on a wide range of research-related topics. Each slot is a manageable coffee-break-sized 30 minutes – just enough time for a breather before you return to your desk refreshed and informed!

Programme

Making a name for yourself with a Google Scholar Citation Profile

11 July 2012

 Presented by Helen Young.
http://pdwww.lboro.ac.uk/eventdetails.asp?run=11603

 Building Google Sites

18 July 2012

Presented by Martin Ashby

http://pdwww.lboro.ac.uk/eventdetails.asp?run=11604

 In full bloom? Managing your research output in LUPIN and the Institutional Repository

25 July 2012

Presented by Angela Crawford, Naomi Dungworth and Katie Appleton
http://pdwww.lboro.ac.uk/eventdetails.asp?run=11605

 

Managing your Research data – use it or lose it?
1 August 2012

Presented by Lizie Gadd

Managing your Research data – use it or lose it?

 

Research, organise and share it with Mendeley

8 August 2012

Presented by Frank Parry and Tariq Abdullah
http://pdwww.lboro.ac.uk/eventdetails.asp?run=11607

 Find funding the easy way with Pivot

15 August 2012

Presented by Tracy Wootton
http://pdwww.lboro.ac.uk/eventdetails.asp?run=11608

 Mobile apps for research

22 August 2012

Presented by Martin Ashby
http://pdwww.lboro.ac.uk/eventdetails.asp?run=11609

Social Media – what’s hot?

29 August 2012

Presented by Ginny Franklin
http://pdwww.lboro.ac.uk/eventdetails.asp?run=11610

All sessions are 11.00 – 11.30am in Library Training Room 1

To book your place please visit the Staff Development booking system or follow the hyperlinks in the table above.

Look forward to seeing you there!

The Top Five Institutional Repository Downloads for April

It may have been vacation time for many but there was no lack of interest in the Institutional Repository over Easter. Here’s a run-down of the top five most downloaded items for April:

1.  Effect of preharvest UV-treatment on shelf life of fruits and vegetables by Matthew A. Obande. (holding steady at no.1 for the third month running with 391 downloads)

2. Feasibility of zero carbon homes in England by 2016: a house builder’s perspective by Mohamed Osmani and Alistair O’Reilly (back up to no.2 from no.3 last month with 168 downloads!)

3. Discourse analysis means doing analysis: a critique of six analytic shortcomings by Charles Antaki, Michael Billig, Derek Edwards & Jonathan Potter (new entry with 159 downloads)

4. Protectionism to liberalisation : Ireland and the EEC, 1957 to 1966 by Maurice Fitzgerald (holding at no.4 with 126 downloads) 

5. Using Google Analytics to evaluate the usability of e-commerce sites by Layla Hasan, Anne Morris & Steve Probets (118 downloads)

Our repository increases the visibility of Loughborough’s research and the materials within it are centrally stored and preserved. The material in the collection includes journal articles, book chapters, conference papers and theses. To find out more about it, and how you can submit your research, visit the IR homepage here.

The Top Five Institutional Repository Downloads For March

The run up to Easter was a busy time for our Institutional Repository. Here’s a run-down of the top five most downloaded items for March:

1.  Effect of preharvest UV-treatment on shelf life of fruits and vegetables by Matthew A. Obande. (holding steady at no.1 with 340 downloads)

2. The effects of open access mandates on institutional repositories in the UK and Germany by Sabine Puskas (151 downloads, up two places from last month!)

3. Feasibility of zero carbon homes in England by 2016: a house builder’s perspective by Mohamed Osmani and Alistair O’Reilly (125 downloads, down one place from no.2 last month)

4. Protectionism to liberalisation : Ireland and the EEC, 1957 to 1966 by Maurice Fitzgerald (109 downloads) 

5. Silica fume concrete in hot and temperate environments by A.S.S. Al-Eesa (98 downloads)

Our repository increases the visibility of Loughborough’s research and the materials within it are centrally stored and preserved. The material in the collection includes journal articles, book chapters, conference papers and theses. To find out more about it, and how you can submit your research, visit the IR homepage here.

The Top Five Institutional Repository Downloads For February

2012 continues on apace into Spring for our Institutional Repository. Here’s a run-down of the top five most downloaded items for February:

1.  Effect of preharvest UV-treatment on shelf life of fruits and vegetables by Matthew A. Obande. (331 downloads, up from no.2 last month!)

2. Feasibility of zero carbon homes in England by 2016: a house builder’s perspective by Mohamed Osmani and Alistair O’Reilly (133 downloads)

3. Once bitten, twice bitten: repeat victimisation and its implications for crime prevention by Graham Farrell & Ken Pease. (86 downloads, holding steady from no.3 last month)

4. The effects of open access mandates on institutional repositories in the UK and Germany by Sabine Puskas (69 downloads)

5. Remote control service system architecture and dynamic web user interface generation by Xi Guo (66 downloads)

Our repository increases the visibility of Loughborough’s research and the materials within it are centrally stored and preserved. The material in the collection includes journal articles, book chapters, conference papers and theses. To find out more about it, and how you can submit your research, visit the IR homepage here.

Top Five Downloaded Articles for January

It’s been a busy start to 2012 in the Library, and business has also been brisk for our Institutional Repository over the New Year period. Here’s a run-down of the top five most downloaded items for January:

1.  The implications of organizational culture and trust in the working of virtual teams by Neil D. Burns, C.J. Backhouse, A.K. Kochhar & Samir Dani. (504 downloads)

2.  Effect of preharvest UV-treatment on shelf life of fruits and vegetables by Matthew A. Obande. (292 downloads)

3. Once bitten, twice bitten: repeat victimisation and its implications for crime prevention by Graham Farrell & Ken Pease. (97 downloads)

4. Polymeric bipolar plates for PEM fuel cells: experimental and modeling approach to assess factors influencing performance by Paul S. Greenwood.  (83 downloads)

5. Internal waves in a three-layer bubbly waveguide by Roger H.J. Grimshaw & Karima R. Khusnutdinova. (82 downloads)

Our repository increases the visibility of Loughborough’s research and the materials within it are centrally stored and preserved. The material in the collection includes journal articles, book chapters, conference papers and theses. To find out more about it, and how you can submit your research, visit the IR homepage here.

Open Access Week

This week marks Open Access Week, which represents an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research.

Now in its fifth year, the scheme promotes the availability of free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as  required. Such freely available access to information is regarded as vitally necessary, having direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole.

The Library has already taken positive steps towards Open Access through our Institutional Repository, which increases the visibility of Loughborough’s research while digitally preserving the University’s intellectual output.

And if you have any queries or issues regarding the IR or Open Access, our team of Academic Librarians are on hand to help. Why not drop them a line?

To find out more about Open Access Week and the scheme, visit their website here.

Open Access? Open Sesame!

Research funding bodies are becoming increasingly keen for all data and material to be made available on Open Access. Organizations such as the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) are beginning to make it a requirement of funding that research is made accessible in this way.

If you’re still a little uncertain about this, the UK Data Archive have recently revised their guide, Managing and Sharing Data – Best Practice for Researchers, which tells you all you need to know about the whys and wherefores of sharing research.

The guide is available for download from their site here. Further useful information about data sharing and the requirements of funding agencies can be found at the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) site here.

The Library’s own Institutional Repository is already committed to Open Access and our collection grows daily – about 7800 at the last count. To find out more about it and its role  in a growing Open Access movement across UK Universities, visit the Library homepage here.