Printer Credits – Not Just to Go, But On the Go

Need to buy some printer credits for your coursework in a hurry? Of course you can buy them from us at our Level 3 Enquiry Desk, but what if it’s after midnight and the desk is closed?

You can still buy printer credits on the go and at any time of the day or night via IT Services ePayments SafeCom system online, using a debit or credit card (minimum £5), which are instantly allocated to your user account. If you are off campus you will need to use the VPN service before you can use the ePayments systems (and if you haven’t already downloaded the VPN, we recommend you so, because you can also use it for all sorts of off-campus access).

For further details visit the IT Services website here: https://www.lboro.ac.uk/services/it/student/printing/print-credits/

Need Some Exam Tips? Ask Lynda!

Looking for some more exam tips? Why not try Lynda, our online learning platform, which has two video playlists specifically aimed at giving examination advice, as well a plethora of academic and learning advice and support.

Take a peek these:

Lynda.com is a learning platform which has over 5000 video tutorials used to develop creative, software, technology and business skills for learning and teaching. Available to all students and staff, Loughborough University has purchased a subscription from Lynda.com to enhance your digital skills and personal development.

To access Lynda, sign In at the top right of the page, click Sign in with your organization portal and simply enter ‘lboro.ac.uk’ in the box asking for your organisation URL. This will direct you to the Loughborough University sign-in page where you enter your University credentials.

Database Trials – Women & Social Movements and Revolution & Protest

We’re trialling two resources from the Alexander Street stable of databases for the next couple of months that should interest social science and politics students.

Women and Social Movements, International (1840-present) is a landmark collection of primary materials on the subject. Through the writings of women activists, their personal letters and diaries, and the proceedings of conferences at which pivotal decisions were made, this collection lets you see how women’s social movements shaped much of the events and attitudes that have defined modern life.

Secondly, we have Revolution and Protest Online, which explores the protest movements, revolutions, and civil wars that have transformed societies and human experience from the 18th century through the present. Organized around more than thirty events and areas, representing a variety of time periods, regions, and topics, this collection will include at completion 175 hours of video, 100,000 pages of printed materials (personal papers, organizations, government documents, journals, reports, monographs, and speeches), and more than 1,000 images.

To begin searching WASI, go to http://search.alexanderstreet.com/wasi , and to sample RPO visit https://search.alexanderstreet.com/revo – access to both databases is via IP address and the trials run until 6th March.

We welcome feedback – good or bad – on this trial, please contact Steve Corn ( s.c.corn@lboro.ac.uk) with your comments.

Exam Support Resources On Campus

Worrying about your exams? Don’t panic – there are a wide range of resources available on campus to help you through the stresses and strains of the exam period, ranging from a wide variety of study spaces (that’s right, not just us!), IT help and personal and medical advice if things are getting on top of you. Visit the University’s one-stop exam support page here – https://www.lboro.ac.uk/students/exam-support/ – for more info.

Spotlight On… Mendeley & Referencing

As more assignment, project and dissertation deadlines loom after Christmas, are you confident about your referencing of resources?  Do you know your in-text citations from your bibliographies or reference list?  Are you getting your commas in the right places?  If referencing stresses you out, come along to our Spotlight stand in the foyer next week to find out more about:

  • What you need to reference
  • Why you need to reference
  • How you should reference correctly
  • What can help you

We look forward to seeing you on Tuesday 8th January 12-2pm and Thursday 10th January 2-4pm.

If you can’t make these times, and want to know more about or help with referencing, don’t worry, you can always contact your academic librarian: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/services/library/students/contactus/academic-librarians/

On the Twelfth Day of Christmas, My True Love Gave to Me… Apps!

Over the last two weeks of term we’ve been running our very own Twelve Days of Christmas countdown in a 21st century style by highlighting some of the great free apps that you can download onto your phone or tablet.

Ranging from the academic to the irreverent, the helpful to the funny, we hope there’s something to tickle your Christmas fancy. The complete rundown is on our Twitter and Instagram feeds (if you’re not following us already, please do, we’d love to hear from you!) and can also be viewed complete in PDF form via this link: 12 Apps of Christmas.

From all of us to all of you going home for the vacation this weekend, we wish you safe journeys and hope you have a very Merry Christmas, and look forward to seeing you all in 2019. Cheers!

Free Times Newspaper Subscription for all Loughborough Students

Loughborough University is partnering with The Times and Sunday Times to offer all students a complimentary subscription to the newspaper’s digital content.

For the next 12 months, students will have digital access to The Times website and its smartphone and tablet apps.

The newspaper will also be hosting a series of exclusive events over the next year featuring its journalists and key political figures.

As a subscriber, you’ll be able to access a number of benefits, including:

  • Smartphone and tablet apps with exclusive interactive features
  • Access to special events with journalists, movie previews and private views
  • Get Odean 2-for-1 cinema tickets every weekend
  • Exclusive access to Premier League and Premiership Rugby video highlights
  • Download a free ebook each month from Times+

To start your subscription, simply follow the instructions you will have been sent to your student email.

“What’s On the Box?” World Television Day

Watching TV by Aaron Escobar, reproduced under CC License

“I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book.”

As librarians, we tend to agree with Groucho Marx’s oft-quoted remark about the medium of television – even in the digital age, we still love a good book – but there is no denying that television is still one of the world’s biggest phenomenons – and is likely to remain so for long years ahead.

And so it was in 1996 that the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 21st November as World Television Day, in recognition of the increasing impact television has on decision-making by bringing world attention to conflicts and threats to peace and security and its potential role in sharpening the focus on other major issues, including economic and social issues. It is not so much a celebration of television as a communication tool, but as a symbol for communication and globalisation in the contemporary world.

We hold a huge range of books about every aspect of the medium among our collection, from historic studies to the nuts-and-bolts of television engineering and broadcasting. We also provide access to a number of very popular online resources all about television, most notably Box of Broadcasts (BoB), from which you can not only catch up with the latest episodes of your favourite shows, but also easily create your own clips from TV programmes, and create useful playlists of clips to refer to at a later date for further study or research. And if you’re more interested in more vintage television, try dipping into the British Film Institute’s archives in BFI Screenonline, where you can watch old episodes of classics like Doctor Who, Fawlty Towers, and even University Challenge!

“It was all started by a Mouse…”

Plastic Mickey Mouse figure from the Glud Museum, Denmark, reproduced under CC License

One of the most iconic characters of modern times celebrates their 90th birthday this very day – the one and only Mickey Mouse!

Created by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks in 1928 for Steamboat Willie, one of the Disney Studios’ earliest sound animations, the character has gone on to appear in over 130 films and countless spin-offs in every conceivable medium – and became the figurehead of the Disney phenomenon. Walt Disney himself acknowledged the debt his studio owed to the lovable cartoon rodent – “it was all started by a mouse”, he declared in an interview in 1954!

We have a wide range of books about Walt Disney, his films and Mickey Mouse among our art and cinema books on Level 2.

You can also explore more about the history and influence of Disney (and Mickey!) at the British Film Institute website and our online art databases including Art Retrospective and Art & Architecture Source.

Spotlight On… Vogue

Interested in fashion, either for your studies or just in general? Then settle down and treat yourself to a browse through the archives of the world’s foremost fashion magazine, Vogue.

The Vogue Archive contains the entire run of Vogue magazine (US edition), from the first issue in 1892 to the current month, reproduced in high-resolution color page images. Every page, advertisement, cover and fold-out has been included, with rich indexing enabling you to find images by garment type, designer and brand names. The Vogue Archive preserves the work of the world’s greatest fashion designers, stylists and photographers and is a unique record of American and international fashion, culture and society from the dawn of the modern era to the present day.

In addition to the editorial content, all covers, advertisements and pictorial features have been captured as separate documents to allow for searching and discovery. For advertisements, the featured company and brand names have been assigned to the document records, and all image captions are captured to a high accuracy, allowing accurate retrieval of photographs and illustrations. Contributor names that appear in image credits, such as photographers, stylists and illustrators, are also indexed.

You can also limit your search by journal editor, and specialist indexing of full-page images from photo features. There are separate designated fields for Fashion Items, Trends, Colour and Prints.

The Vogue Archive is available through Library Catalogue Plus and seperately via Proquest here.