What’s New in Learn

Following this year’s Learn rollover (23rd and 24th July) there will be several new features appearing in Learn:

  • Timeline tab to appear alongside the ‘My Modules’ dashboard, which gives students the ability to display outstanding activities in date order. This tab is effectively a checklist – as soon as an assignment is completed it will no longer appear within the activity list. Watch the three minute video to learn more about the timeline tabhttps://youtu.be/mmzmNTK2Ww4

  • Reminder to grade alert is now an option that can be enabled within the Learn Assignment Activity. The alert will trigger a notification that grading is due. Watch the four minute video for an updated look at the Learn Assignment tool://youtu.be/09V8IyiNQ1Y

  • Collapsible comments, similar to those available within Turnitin Feedback Studio, are now available within the Learn Assignment Activity. Watch the one minute video on how to do this: https://youtu.be/_6EqV63hkJc

  • File type restrictions allow you to specify what types of files should be submitted within the Learn Assignment and Workshop activities in Learn. A list of file types will be presented for you to choose from within the activity. Watch the one minute video on how to do this: https://youtu.be/-M2vWx3-7bQ

  • Stealth Activities – A way to neatly create ‘orphaned’ activities that are hidden but available via a link. Watch the two minute video on how to do this: https://youtu.be/Z8e3BSopTg8

You can see/test out these features on the Mount Orange demo site – https://school.demo.moodle.net (login as a teacher using the username: teacher and password: moodle).

Supporting students’ learning using STACK: Application on a Finance module

Kai-Hong Tee (School of Business and Economics) has been using the STACK question type in Learn to generate mathematical questions. In the post below, Kai explains how it works and why it benefits students. 

Background
I am currently teaching “Financial Management” which is offered as a core module for our second-year students studying for the “Accounting and Financial Management” (AFM) and “Banking and Financial Management” (BFM) degree programs, which are currently one of the best in the UK, with the latest ranking from the Guardian at the second place after University of Bath. The AFM degree is also accredited by the professional accounting body, we follow strict criteria when teaching the students and appropriately assessed them. However, as this module is also opened to other students whose degree programs are less mathematical in nature, such as Marketing and International business, it is important that “Financial Management” must provide sufficient support taking care of a wider range of students of different capabilities. This prompted me to re-think and re-design an existing self-assessment exercise that already has been available to students on LEARN. Figure 1 shows the questions and answers I have been using to help students on Learn. This assessment is based on one topic (equity valuation) in which most students don’t feel very confident, based on my observation and years of experience teaching “Financial Management”.

Figure 1. 

 

As you can see from figure 1, this self-assessment exercise consists of limited questions. The aim, however, is to encourage students to gain a better understanding on the topic through practicing doing the problems. However, for the weaker students, having just 4 or 5 questions may not be enough to develop the skill required for this topic.

Why use the STACK question type?
To efficiently supply larger number of questions so as to allow students to have more chances to practice them to acquire the skills, I adopted the STACK question type in the Learn Quiz activity to enable mathematical questions to be generated automatically. Currently, STACK has been applied in different schools, including the subject areas of engineering and mathematics. Figure 2 shows a snapshot of a question set up using STACK on LEARN. Figure 3 shows that using STACK it is possible to generate a similar question to be done again with different information. This then allows students to have additional practice.

Figure 2.

Figure 3. 

I’ve applied this idea to “financial management”. Figure 4 is an example of a question. Figure 5 shows that students will receive feedback on the answers they provide.

Figure 4.

Figure 5. 

New questions will be generated automatically and can be viewed by clicking on “start a new preview” (see figure 3), the implementation of STACK therefore involves some program coding. Figure 6 gives a snapshot of the “program coding” screen. Here, every question is treated as a “model”, and the “numbers” in the question as “variables”, since they will be different in each attempt of the students to “start a new preview”. Figure 6 shows the range of “variables” (inputs) that you want to set for your questions, representing the “new” question each time a new preview is attempted.

Figure 6.

What’s next?
One issue I face here is that the “new” question won’t have the text changed, just the “numbers”, there may therefore be a familiarity after a few rounds of practicing the questions if there are insufficient questions. Therefore, to increase the effectiveness, more questions can be included to reduce biases arising from “getting right answers because of familiarity”. These questions of different level of difficulties are then re-shuffld for each new round of attempt made by the students.

An area that is worth further developing is to incorporate adaptive learning pathways. Basically, I would only need, for example, 5 questions of different levels of difficulty, and then work on them to create pathways based on the feedback (answers) from the students. From the feedback, this then indicates which level of difficulty is reasonable to further assess the students. It may be possible for STACK to be developed in a way that students are led to attempt questions of reasonable level so that their standards are monitored and matched so that appropriate skills could be developed alongside sufficient practices of more suitable questions. This will be an area for future investigation. If workable, this should support the weaker students better. This implies that students could practice more questions and become more skillful based on their level of understanding, rather than simply practice any available questions without adequate understanding of their standards.

Further information at STACK can be found on the following page:
 http://www.stack.ed.ac.uk 

Tutorials on STACK are available on:  https://stack2.maths.ed.ac.uk/demo/question/type/stack/doc/doc.php/Authoring/Authoring_quick_start.md 

Advance HE Mental Well-being Training: Embedding Mental Well-being in the Curriculum

In the following post Dr Sarah Turner (Director of the CAP Taught Course Programme) reflects on the recent Advance HE workshop on ‘Embedding Mental Well-being in the Curriculum’

With many key headlines surrounding Mental Health of students, this workshop was a good reminder to stand back and consider how we can support students (and staff) within our programme design.

Here are some points to digest and consider over the coming months about how we encourage positive learning opportunities that also create a supportive learning environment to promote positive mental health:

  • Teachers are the frontline for students – what could/should we be doing about this? How do we cover this in our tutor roles?
  • Post-graduate / Undergraduates / Foundation students – useful for staff to know the weeks where there are known ‘dips’ in student/staff well-being e.g. period of assessment, after Christmas. Encouraging sharing of well-being as a mode to ‘check-in’ with students.
  • World Health Organisation definition (2014) helpful to consider:
  • It’s everywhere but often invisible so perhaps the challenge is making it more explicit?
  • A5 diagnostic chart for each member of staff (on their wall/desk) so they know who to contact if something arises with a student in a tutorial?
  • 5 ways to embed well-being in a curriculum (by New Economic Foundation NEF):
    • Connect – connecting with students, personal 1:1, making friends in seminars, connections through learning in the classroom
    • Be active –  moving around e.g. walks together
    • Take notice – encourage people to be aware of their environment in Teaching and learning
    • Give – peer support / peer learning / how students give back to the Uni and how they can be citizens
    • Keep learning – foster independence, self-direction amongst students e.g. week 5 is health and well-being week – come along and colour the Uni colour map or come for a massage

Further Resources from the workshop are available below:

 

3rd Loughborough University Annual Learning and Teaching Conference 2018: Educating for Success

We are delighted to announce the themes for our annual Learning and Teaching Conference, which is being held in West Park Teaching Hub on 27th June 2018. The themes are:

  • Digital Literacy
  • Engaging students in the learning process
  • Student Wellbeing
  • How do students learn?

The call for abstracts of approximately 300 words is now open and full papers will not be required. Abstracts should be emailed to Glynis Perkin (g.perkin@lboro.ac.uk) and Sarah Bamforth (s.e.bamforth@lboro.ac.uk)

This year there are several different types of sessions from which presenters will be able to choose.

  • 5-minute presentations – Themed Sessions
  • 10-minute presentations – Mini Master class
  • 50-minute sessions – Interactive Workshop or Presentation. Suggested Topics are Virtual Reality or Inclusivity, however, abstracts under the broader themes of the conference are also welcome.
  • 30-minute Campfire sessions (introduce a topic, facilitate and drive a discussion on the topic but not the content).

There are also other opportunities to contribute (abstract not required)

  • World Café – facilitate small group discussions on a pre-determined issue.
  • Technology Showcase – book a stand to demonstrate the technology you use to enhance learning. For example: virtual reality; subject in a box.

The conference website is now being developed and may be viewed at: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/services/cap/lborolt18/ 

We look forward to welcoming you to a vibrant event showcasing current areas of interest.

2018 Research-informed Teaching Awards now open

The Research-informed Teaching Awards (RiTAs) have been launched for 2017/18.
They are designed to “recognise and celebrate academic staff who have made a sustained and outstanding contribution to the promotion of research-informed teaching at Loughborough University”.

There have been a number of changes to the RiTA over recent years, including making this a more competitive process with no limits on the number of applications each School may make.

Applicants for this award will need to submit a claim to their School Operations Manager or ADT by 9th March 2018. As with the Teaching Innovation Awards, our other teaching award, full details are on the CAP website – see http://www.lboro.ac.uk/services/cap/procedures-schemes/teaching-awards/

Presentations by the three recipients of the Vice-Chancellor’s awards for excellence in teaching and learning

The most recent CAP forum, introduced by Dr Nick Allsopp, provided opportunity for the three recipients of the Vice-Chancellor’s awards for excellence in teaching and learning to disseminate their practice. The event was well attended and each of the speakers engaged in a lively debate after their presentations.

Dr Cheryl Travers from the School of Business and economics disseminated her good practice relating to learning, transfer and impact where she used a five-stage model to encourage and help students to write smarter goals by using reflective practice. Further information is available in the following blog post: How to Evidence Excellence in Teaching and Learning – Reflective Goal Setting

The second speaker was Paula Gamble-Schwarz from the School of the Arts who presented on the Arts Foundation course. Paula talked about how this course, which has approximately 180 registered students, had been successfully restructured; students receive 20 hours contact per week and participate in a collaborative exhibition with Japanese students from Joshibi University of Art and Design. Further information is available on the following blog post: How to Evidence Excellence in Teaching and Learning – Foundation Programme

The final presentation was given by Dr Richard Hodgkins from Geography who focused on the importance of obtaining buy-in from the students and the student experience. He gave details about the achievement of accreditation from the Royal Geographical Society for our Geography degree programme. This accreditation has only been achieved by 20 institutions. Further information is available in the following blog post: Giving Students, Parents and Employers Confidence: Geography’s Experiences of Accreditation

 

 

 

How to Evidence Excellence in Teaching and Learning – Reflective Goal Setting

Cheryl Travers (School of Business and Economics) was delighted this year to be one of the recipients of the Vice Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. In the post below, Cheryl explains why she is passionate about innovating and improving the student learning experiences.

Arriving at Loughborough more than 24 years ago now, I was passionate about finding ways to deliver innovative, developmental, transferable and impactful student learning experiences. I wanted to give Psychology away to our students, to maximise their potential as employable, successful, resilient and happy future leaders and members of society. Over the years I have eagerly shared my approach and enthusiasm for learning and teaching with other faculty across campus to aid their own personal and professional development, as well as provide ideas for advancing androgogy. In addition, I have sought to spread the word via other means, e.g., online materials (https://youtu.be/yfT8_t9c8JE), regular contributions to SBE blogs and in house magazine ‘Inspire’, the media, key notes at SBE client conferences, and TEDx talks to reach a wider international audience. (https://youtu.be/8oSEQ7f6QRQ and https://youtu.be/q52A0aCFcq0). The impact for me, personally, has been a very satisfying and fulfilling learning and teaching career to date, sprinkled with a number of learning and teaching related awards (SBE Teacher of the Year award (2012), USA Academy of Management ‘Management Education Division’ award for ‘Most innovative contribution to management education’ (2014); Loughborough RiTA award (2016); BPS Division of Occupational Psychology Academic Contribution to Practice (2017) in addition to the VC excellence award this year). I am very proud of the academic, professional and international recognition I have received for my teaching and research.

I feel my most influential and far reaching contribution has been the design and dissemination of my Reflective Goal Setting (RGS) model, which was created to; support the transfer of learning across a range of UG, PG and Executive Education programmes; turn our students into highly interpersonally skilled and adaptable goal setters; and to enhance students’ employment and leadership potential. The resulting data gathered on their goal experiences has provided evidence for the ongoing impact of RGS and has resulted in a number of outputs so far (e.g. Travers, C.J. (2011), Unveiling a reflective diary methodology for exploring the lived experiences of stress and coping, Journal of Vocational Behavior, 79 (204-216); Travers, C.J. (2013),Using Goal Setting Theory to Promote Personal Development, Ch 36 pp 603-621 in New Developments in Goal Setting and Task Performance, Ed Locke and Gary Latham (Eds), Routledge; Travers, C, Morisano, D, & Lock, E. A. (2015). Growth goals and academic achievement: A qualitative study. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 85(2), 224-241). Currently we are carrying out evaluation and impact research on this model and the findings so far suggest that it can have far reaching impact for individuals, their teams and the organisations within which they work.

HEA National Teaching Fellowship Scheme – Applications

The National Teaching Fellowship Scheme (NTFS) run by the Higher Education Academy opens its application ‘window’ in January 2018. Each University is able to support up to three candidates for NTF and Loughborough University now has an established process for choosing and then mentoring potential candidates for submission.

The first stage in this process is attendance at a workshop design to provide further information and to discuss the requirements for submission. The workshop will take place on 21st November 2017 from 12.00 – 1.00pm in Rutland 1.13a.

In preparation for the workshop colleagues are asked to write around 500 words about their teaching practice and bring this to the session. This should address the NTFS criteria:

  • Individual excellence: evidence of enhancing and transforming the student learning experience commensurate with the individual’s context and the opportunities afforded by it.
  • Raising the profile of excellence: evidence of supporting colleagues and influencing support for student learning; demonstrating impact and engagement beyond the nominee’s immediate academic or professional role
  • Developing excellence: evidence of the nominee’s commitment to her/his ongoing professional development with regard to teaching and learning and/or learning support

You can find out more about the NTFS on https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/professional-recognition/awards/national-teaching-fellowship-scheme-ntfs

All enquires to Nick Allsopp in CAP- email: N.J.Allsopp@lboro.ac.uk

How to Evidence Excellence in Teaching and Learning – Foundation Programme

Paula Gamble-Schwarz and colleagues on the Foundation Art & Design programme were delighted this year to be one of the recipients of the Vice Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. In the post below, Paula explains and shares their successful application template, which can act as a guide for programme teams.

I believe that within the one year Foundation Programme (SAED), we continually evidence a professional and meaningful level of contact, stimulation, challenge and achievement which can be supported by analysis of our student outcomes, staff collaboration, student support and academic culture. Students achieve through the implementation of our ongoing programme of excellence. Foundation staff are engaged and active in their modelling, mentoring, mutual appreciation, productive action and achievement of learner outcomes (evidenced in Ofsted report). I would like to be considered for the VC’S Award for Excellence in Learning and Teaching in recognition of the outstanding learning outcomes and achievements that I support via my team across the Foundation Programme.

Key changes to GCE and A Levels

The following post is by Dr Glynis Perkin.

Fundamental changes to the content and structure are taking place in the GCE A Level curriculum. There are 14 subjects with the new curriculum that have been examined for the first time in summer 2017 and many students entering university in the 2017/18 academic year will have taken these examinations. The 14 subjects are:

  • Art and Design
  • Biology
  • Business
  • Chemistry
  • Computer Science
  • Economics
  • English Language
  • English Language and Literature
  • English Literature A
  • English Literature B
  • History
  • Physics
  • Psychology
  • Sociology

The key changes to these A Levels are that they are now non-modular with most subjects being assessed mainly by examination at the end of the course. AS Level is a stand-alone qualification and no longer counts towards a GCE A Level. Furthermore, content has been reviewed and updated with input from university staff.

The key changes for each subject have been collated with links to more detailed information also provided; the slides are available on the CAP website at: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/services/cap/documents-resources/